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Daniel A

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About Daniel A

  • Rank
    Cool Cruiser

About Me

  • Location
    New York Suburbs
  • Interests
    History, Reading, Vacationing
  • Favorite Cruise Line(s)
    Princess
  • Favorite Cruise Destination Or Port of Call
    Caribbean

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  1. Sorry, I missed where Key West said that in the referendum.
  2. I may have missed something here, but where did you see that they limited the number of ships as well? It is obvious if one charter amendment says no ships that can have more than 1300 people onboard and another one says no more than 1500 people can disembark in the same day, they obviously anticipate more than one ship can dock the same day. Whatever, It isn't my desire to debate the pros or cons of the vote in KW. I just wanted to update that the vote in KW isn't necessarily a done deal. We'll just have to wait and see what the Florida legislature thinks about the bans.
  3. Very interesting, I didn't know that part of it. So the Feds are basically similar to Florida in this regard. Thanks.
  4. Thank you, that is what I try to do. 🙂
  5. Now, you're really making me do some research. 😄 According to the Florida Constitution Article III Section 8: "Every bill passed by the legislature shall be presented to the governor for approval and shall become a law if the governor approves and signs it, or fails to veto it within seven consecutive days after presentation."
  6. Both statements are not accurate. Key West voted to ban ships with a capacity of 1300 persons (that is PAX and Crew) not ships of a certain tonnage. If the ships are under that capacity, the ban goes further to ban more than 1,500 cruise passengers permitted to disembark each day. So if two ships are docked and each has 1200 souls on board, 900 people are banned from disembarking into the city. How does KW plan to decide who are the 900 who aren't permitted in Key West? In my book, when they state they are preventing people from entering the city, it is a ban on people. We're
  7. No, I didn't. When this ban happened there was a lot of discussion on the Princess Board because the ban would have blocked all Princess Vessels from calling on Key West. I just wanted to update the Princess readers about the current status of the KW ban. But, please, feel free to post it on the KW board as well.
  8. So, then you wouldn't mind if you drove the 225 miles to Gettysburg with your kids only to be told you can't come in because there are already 500 tourists who got there before you? Does it work any better for the family taking the trip from Duluth to Gettysburg? Part of the problem is that they're not limiting the number of tourists in KW, they're limiting the type of tourists. Time will tell what will happen. Does Pittsburgh have the right to limit the number of students allowed in?
  9. You're correct. That's why I wrote "May Be In Jeopardy" It's early, but it's a start.
  10. You got me interested so I looked it up. Here is what I discovered: In Florida, the bill does not require the signature of the governor. If he signs it, it becomes law. If he doesn't sign it and allows it to sit on his desk, it becomes law. If he actively vetoes the bill then it goes back to both houses for a 2/3 override in each house. In the Federal System and probably other states, when the chief executive (president or governor) allows the bill to sit on his desk without a signature, it becomes a 'pocket veto.' Apparently under Florida's system the opposite happens and the unsigned
  11. One would ordinarily think so, in Florida, the bill does not require the signature of the governor. If he signs it, it becomes law. If he doesn't sign it and allows it to sit on his desk, it becomes law. If he actively vetoes the bill then it goes back to both houses for a 2/3 override in each house. In the Federal System and probably other states, when the chief executive (president or governor) allows the bill to sit on his desk without a signature, it becomes a 'pocket veto.' Apparently under Florida's system the opposite happens and the unsigned bill becomes law.
  12. I only saw where the article only mentioned about both houses of the legislature but you're probably correct.
  13. That may be true, but why on earth would somebody want to own a pier and then deny money paying customers access to their product? That just wouldn't make any sense. I believe the current piers in KW are municipally operated, much like Port Everglades. I think there is a new pier being constructed which will be under private ownership.
  14. Key West’s recently enacted Cruise Ship ban may be in Jeopardy if Florida legislation passes. “Republican Sen. Jim Boyd from the state’s west coast on Jan. 5 had filed Senate Bill 426, which, . . . if passed, would void Key West’s voter-approved changes to the city charter requiring the city to significantly reduce the size and capacity of cruise ships that visit the island.” The bills state, in part, “a local government may not restrict or regulate commerce in the seaports of this state … including, but not limited to, regulating or restricting a vessel’s type or si
  15. Key West’s recently enacted cruise ship ban may be in Jeopardy if Florida legislation passes. “Republican Sen. Jim Boyd from the state’s west coast on Jan. 5 had filed Senate Bill 426, . . . The bill, if passed, would void Key West’s voter-approved changes to the city charter requiring the city to significantly reduce the size and capacity of cruise ships that visit the island.” The bills state, in part, “a local government may not restrict or regulate commerce in the seaports of this state … including, but not limited to, regulating or restricting a vessel’s type or s
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