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chengkp75

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About chengkp75

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    Maine or at sea
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    Former cruise ship Chief Engineer

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  1. Just know that "medical evacuation insurance" does not cover an aerial evacuation from the ship. It only covers getting you from a medical facility where you've been disembarked to your home hospital. As for the lawsuit, there are a lot of things in it that don't make any sense, like "we can't evacuate you, because someone else is first"? I don't believe this for a second. My personal feeling is that when the people were informed of the cost of a medical flight to the US, they decided to remain on the ship, and when things went south, they decided to sue. JMHO.
  2. Whether its a "standard" tetrapak or this "biodegradable" one, my bet is it ends up in the incinerator onboard.
  3. OP, did you contact the port administration itself? Particularly in Italy, probably not likely to get an answer. Ask the cruise line for the contact information for their port agent in Naples, and contact them for any cost information and details of what you have to do. They can also set up ground transportation, for a fee.
  4. A fun fact I found a couple of days ago, when refreshing my mind on this topic for a Celebrity thread. And, by the way, Ms. Williams was announced as being promoted to Captain at Celebrity, but Virgin obviously gave her a better offer. Anyway, the fun fact is that, percentage wise, there are as many female cruise ship Captains as there are female airline Captains, around 3%. That represents 9 ship and about 4000 airline Captains. And the glass ceiling was broken 30 years ago, when the first female Captain was promoted on an ocean-going vessel. Everyone makes a big deal about cruise ship Captains because of the visibility of the industry, but if it were not for the true pioneers who started their maritime careers back in the 70's and 80's, these women most likely wouldn't be where they are today. Those women fought the stigma, the discrimination, and the infrastructure to allow women into the previously all male arena of maritime officers.
  5. I agree that they are separate, just that there is an overlap.
  6. Absolutely agree, but there just doesn't seem to be the interest in the maritime from women. Many start out a career, but leave within a couple of years.
  7. All mandated in the probation settlement agreement, applies across all Carnival Corp lines. Proof will not be in press releases, but in actions, contrary to Princess' 26 years and Carnival's 20 years of environmental non-compliance.
  8. Cruise ships are "two compartment" ships, meaning that even if two adjacent watertight compartments (and there are 12-15 of these along the length of Zuiderdam), flood completely to the waterline, the ship will not sink. A 2 meter hole, would only breach one compartment, or, if placed absolutely correctly with no visible clues on the outside of the hull, could breach two compartments. And the crew are trained for emergencies of hull breaches, and there are ways to semi-seal a hole like this. Done damage control in the Navy, done more than a few piping breaks with sea ingress in 40+ years at sea.
  9. Again, a shaped charge, not something you bring in your rubber dinghy. One ship has a cargo of methanol, and this did not catch fire even after the explosion. One ship has a cargo of naptha (the same stuff used in coleman lanterns and camp stoves), and this flammable cargo did ignite. Both of these cargoes are carried in inert tanks to prevent explosion, but when leaked to free atmosphere they will burn. On the other hand, marine residual fuel is almost impossible to ignite without an incendiary attached to the explosive, and this is what would be most likely in a cruise ship. Further, neither explosion has caused sufficient damage to the ships to consider them "sinking", I believe at least one is under tow. On a cruise ship, there are no fuel tanks along the side of the ship, and no flammable cargo tanks, all fuel tanks are along the bottom of the ship. Yes, even using something like this limpet mine on a cruise ship, you would put a hole a couple meters across in the hull, but none of the passengers would be in danger, few of the crew, and the ship would not sink. Have either of these two ships, carrying thousands of tons of highly flammable cargo, exploded in a fire ball, or broken in half the way hollywood always shows these things? Nope.
  10. I believe this is the same Wendy Williams who was lured away from Celebrity to Virgin. An interesting fact is that there are as many female cruise ship Captains as there are female airline Captains, percentage wise, around 3% in 2016. There were 9 female cruise ship Captains that year, and 4000 female airline Captains. Also, if you google "female ship Captain" or "first US female ship Captain" you get pages and pages of Captain Kate, while in fact she owes her spot to several predecessors, including the first US woman ocean-going ship Captain, Lynn Korwatch in 1988, or thirty years ago. I fully support women mariners, and have served with a lot, but outside of North America and Europe, I don't see the numbers growing much for cultural reasons, and even in NA and Europe, the unique hardships of the industry don't tend to attract women long term.
  11. True, but the CDC developed the VSP, but the USPH provides the inspectors, since it is their mandate to prevent the introduction of diseases into the US.
  12. Oil, natural gas, and coal account for 68% of the world's energy production (I've seen up to 80% from some sources), and this percentage hasn't varied much in the last two decades. Nuclear power only accounts for about 15%, and hydro about 16%. Coal leads the field producing 40% of the world's electricity.
  13. The vast majority of the plastic waste in the oceans is not caused by ships, whether cruise or cargo. It is from land, where it washes down rivers and from harbors.
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