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English vs American

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The Northumbrian "R" is special to the region...almost French in sound. I hope it never dies out.

Hat- yes, my yard is about a yard square....that's how it got its name....but now it's become acceptable as a word for a garden.

Jo.

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An why do Americans say they are going to the "bathroom" or "Restroom", when the neither want a bath or a rest????????? Oh well. :D

 

Well I think it sounds better then saying "Toiletroom" lol.

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Geordie, Northumbrian, Dane, whatever. Glorious part of the country to be from, regardless!:D

 

Totally agree! Beaches and countryside are wonderful, just a shame about the weather, though.

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I was always amazed to see the young girls heading out to the Quayside for a night of mayhem and revelry dressed only in a curtain pelmet in the depth of midwinter. I believe it was a great place to be a student!

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Or have a back yard which measures an acre.

Now, I REALLY have a back yard!!!:(

Jo.

I also have a front yard....

Jo.

PICT1673.jpg.002bd48094b706b7691481115d0506fd.jpg

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Curtain pelmet. :confused: Had to google that!

 

Reminds me of my first visit to Edinburgh in May. I was still wearing my turtleneck sweater, sitting in the park waiting for an afternoon train. The citizens were out sunning themselves at lunch time. I watched a gent in a business suit remove and fold his jacket and tie, then his waistcoat (notice I didn't say 'vest') and then his white shirt. He pillowed these items and lay down in the sun. Not something I'd ever seen in the colonies. Sorry I missed the girls in the curtain pelmets.:rolleyes:

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I was always amazed to see the young girls heading out to the Quayside for a night of mayhem and revelry dressed only in a curtain pelmet in the depth of midwinter. I believe it was a great place to be a student!

 

Its not just on the Quayside, either. It happens in the other towns in the North. Out in skimpy tops in the snow! It makes me shiver just to think about it. I believe it is because they can't be bothered to "check in" coats in the pubs/clubs or have a coat stolen. I must be a soft southerner now, need to be wrapped up well in the cold weather. Or maybe with age, we grow wiser ;).

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In another lifetime, I sailed with a Geordie Bosun. For nearly 6 months I was convinced he was Russian, never understood a b&**#y word he said!!

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England and America, two countries separated by a common language.

By the way, Americans don't speak English, we speak Americanish. :)

 

;) Here in the states we have some big differences in the language we use. A New Englander has difficulties in the deep south, and visa versa. Out west we slip in some spanish now and then just to keep those easterners guessing. Then we have Canadians coming down for the winter months along with folks from our northern states, and that adds to all the fun. I went aboard an English corvette once and could not understand a word the Officer of the deck spoke, but his BoatswainsMate was perfectly understandable. Yes, our common language is a wonderful and sometimes confusing thing well worth talking about:D

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What's so fascinating is that English was taken to the US and Australia by emigrants from England so why did the language develop so differently.

Is the Spanish spoken on the West Coast similarly different to the Spanish spoken in S. America and in Spain ?

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What's so fascinating is that English was taken to the US and Australia by emigrants from England so why did the language develop so differently.

Is the Spanish spoken on the West Coast similarly different to the Spanish spoken in S. America and in Spain ?

 

SI! The Spanish spoken in northern Mexico is different than the Spanish spoken in southern Mexico. Then when you go from country to country in the rest of the Americas, it gets more and more different. I've seen a Spanish-English dictionary that takes into account all of the various Spanish speaking countries in the world - it's very large. Let's face it, until after World War II (and especially since the internet age), the peoples of the world were pretty insulated from those not too far away from their home...and language would not have the cross-polination that it has now.

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In most cases I find the British terms preferable, but the one I hate seeing on this site is, "Gutted." I get such a visceral image with that term that I find it off-putting.

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SI! The Spanish spoken in northern Mexico is different than the Spanish spoken in southern Mexico. Then when you go from country to country in the rest of the Americas, it gets more and more different. I've seen a Spanish-English dictionary that takes into account all of the various Spanish speaking countries in the world - it's very large. Let's face it, until after World War II (and especially since the internet age), the peoples of the world were pretty insulated from those not too far away from their home...and language would not have the cross-polination that it has now.

 

Very interesting thread. Thanks OP for starting it.

 

I think the distance makes all the difference in the way languages develop and diverge. European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese are very different, more so in my opinion (as a language professional working with both) than UK English and US English.

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I'm American and my partner a Brit, so we've had lots of "fun" over the years, especially the early ones, deciphering what the other was talking about sometimes...( For several months whenever he said he was "knackered" I thought he meant he was feeling amorous)...Don't ask. :rolleyes: :D

 

On a different note, I had to take a linguistics class once and the professor said that the reason the accent had changed so much over time is that when so many non-English speaking people began immigrating to the US they were taught English phonetically and that's what eventually caused the change over in accent...I don't know if that's true or not, but I thought it was interesting and sounded plausible.

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At breakfast, on a cruise ship, I was thrilled that I recognised a Canadian accent, spoken by a man with a beautiful voice.

When he went to get a coffee, I mentioned this to his wife, who replied that he was from Devon.....they sound remarkably alike, and of course, lots of Devonians went to the N. Americas.

I also said that with a voice like that, he should be on the radio....he was Bill Giles, the BBC weatherman, and a speaker on the cruise....(cringe!)

Jo.

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What's so fascinating is that English was taken to the US and Australia by emigrants from England so why did the language develop so differently.

Is the Spanish spoken on the West Coast similarly different to the Spanish spoken in S. America and in Spain ?

Yes!! We speak English in both countries, and yet for some reason Australians did not develop the American twang, or drawl, as has been developed in so many different states. But, Australians did not develop the many and varied dialects and accents as pronounced between the English counties. Why?? or Why not??

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Yes!! We speak English in both countries, and yet for some reason Australians did not develop the American twang, or drawl, as has been developed in so many different states. But, Australians did not develop the many and varied dialects and accents as pronounced between the English counties. Why?? or Why not??

As previously mentioned, there was little communication between groups of people from outside your area.....as a child, I could recognise the difference between a Leeds and Wakefield dialect- a whole 9 miles apart. I was also aware of the accent in the small villages surrounding these cities, which was much slower, and didn't miss out the "T" in words such as "butter". Australia has been settled by people from all over the UK, and hasn't yet had time to regionalise as much.

Jo.

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Obviously English started being spoken in America as a result of English settlers there and I often wonder how and why it developed so differently.

Why is their spelling different ?

In the UK we say bag (for hand bag) . When I first started on CC I couldn't understand why the Americans always referred to a purse. Then I realised that purse means handbag . There was a thread about pick pockets and it was really confusing at first.

As I understand it, the spelling of most English words in the US has remained unchanged since the early settlers, but in the UK there was a period when French became fashionable and a French spelling was adopted for certain words on place of the original English. eg, center became centre, gray became grey. In the US, they just continued using the original spelling.

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This is a really interesting thread! Thanks!

 

I have a strange quirk / issue / habit related to this topic :o:

 

I am an American and have always been an avid reader of English classic literature. Over the years, all that reading of English spellings of certain words sunk in and changed the way I spell. I never really made the conscious choice to do so, that I can recall. But I write colour, neighbour, favourite, grey, theatre, centre, catalogue, dreamt, etc. When I read the American spellings of such words they sometimes just look wrong. I'm not consistent in using all English spellings, though. I think it's just for the words that I read most frequently in my formative years. I'm aware that this American / English mix makes my writing look odd.:o

 

I wonder if there is anyone else that has this dual-spelling issue, or if I'm just a freak.:confused::o

 

Anyway, that's my confession. I'm sorry to babble on so. Thank you for 'listening'.

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That's interesting, Shaky Beef! I've never understood why RCI has a "Splendour", and Carnival a "Splendor", as I thought that US managed ships would conform to the US way.

About the adoption of French spellings....there was also a time during the Napoleonic Wars, when the "top" people wouldn't use French words, so "mirror" became "looking glass" etc....eventually these terms were known as "U" or "Non U" words, and showed whether you were out of the top drawer! :(

Jo.

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SI! The Spanish spoken in northern Mexico is different than the Spanish spoken in southern Mexico. Then when you go from country to country in the rest of the Americas, it gets more and more different. I've seen a Spanish-English dictionary that takes into account all of the various Spanish speaking countries in the world - it's very large. Let's face it, until after World War II (and especially since the internet age), the peoples of the world were pretty insulated from those not too far away from their home...and language would not have the cross-polination that it has now.

 

We flew to Miami last year to join the Emerald Princess and were amazed at how few people in the shops spoke english of any kind. We had never been to America before and needed a few things to take on board. Is it spanish or mexican that is the local language? :rolleyes:

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We flew to Miami last year to join the Emerald Princess and were amazed at how few people in the shops spoke english of any kind. We had never been to America before and needed a few things to take on board. Is it spanish or mexican that is the local language? :rolleyes:

 

Those are Cubans with some from the Dominican Republic and various South American countries in Florida - a whole different ballgame than the Mexicans here in Texas! That said, I think most did speak English (mas o menos), but for some reason decided to give you "trouble"!:eek::D;)

 

P.S. Just to translate - mas o menos in Spanish is more or less in English!

Edited by Texas Tillie

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