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Cost of a Turkish rug??

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What can one expect to pay as a good deal on a Turkish Rug, possibly 8 x 11 or something in that size range?

 

Anywhere from $4000 up, depending on quality. I bought a small 3 x 4 one as a wall hanging and it was almost $800.

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Depends on what its made of……. all silk, silk with wool, wool - do some research.

 

We have purchased 4 now.

 

One large one is silk and wool….. gorgeous. Bought it with another small one that was wool and of a tribal type….. also gorgeous. Paid $20,000. for the 2.

 

That was after intense negotiations with dh and the salesman. They wanted 34,000.00 for the large one alone in the beginning. 8400.00 for the small one in the beginning. AFter all was said and done we had both for $20,000.

 

Our recent trip (a few weeks ago) we bought 2 smaller ones for our son and his wife…… $6500.00 for both. One was maybe 4 X 6 and the other a bit smaller. Both were all silk (more expensive).

 

The key is research !

 

Bargain Bargain Bargain !!!!!!! Offer half and go up from there.

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Actually I suggest offering 33% to 40% and then bargain from there, perhaps agreeing at not more than 50% of original asking price. Believe me they are better bargainers than us and will not sell below what their true bottom line. It takes time, possibly walking away, etc, but be polite.

Edited by dabear

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It pays to do research at local rug shops before going. Even at home

I usually start with offering 2\3 the list price. Also research the merits of wool vs silk or blend.

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Research, research, and more research.

 

Buying abroad leaves little room for recourse once you hand over the $$$$$

 

Negotiate like crazy, I'd now buy anything that isn't at least 30-50% off what they initial offer, at least in Turkey :D

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I lived in Saudi Arabia for five years and read a couple of books about oriental carpets. Also, I have negotiated for many a carpet.

 

Here are some tips:

 

When I lived in Saudi 30 years ago, the price of handmade carpets were about 35-50% less than what you paid for them in the USA.

 

I did some carpet shopping in the USA a few years ago and was surprised to find that the prices are cheaper now for the same quality carpets. That is cheaper than those sold in the USA. Also, have been to Turkey twice in the past five years and was not impressed with the deals offered by the carpet merchants. Of course, I did not attempt to negotiate for a carpet, since I didn't want another.

 

 

1) Make sure you are buying a handmade carpet. If you don't know the difference, you need to do some shopping in the USA and after some shopping, you will likely be able to tell the difference. Main difference is that the machine made carpets are perfectly stitched (look on the back side of the carpet). Handmade carpets are not perfectly symmetrical.

 

2) By shopping in the USA, go to more than one shop, you will be able to price carpets as well. A Double knot carpet is more expensive than a single knot carpet. The doubles are thick and don't bunch up. Also, take a magnifying glass and try to try to count the stitches per square inch. The more stitches, the more valuable.

 

3) Research on the internet for what makes these carpets valuable, for example, the most valuable are from Iran. Pakistan and India, then Turkey. Afghan carpets are the cheapest.

 

4) ALWAYS bargain when buying a carpet. Look at many and if possible watch someone else that is bargaining first. Make the carpet dealer come down at least once before you even offer your price. Be patient and if necessary, try to be friendly and establish a relationship with the dealer. Dealers used to offer me tea and negotiations would take an hour, with three cups of tea. Expect to pay half, at least of what the first offering price that is stated. If you can't get a deal, just walk out, if they really want to sell to you, they will come out the door for you.

 

5) Most carpets are wool. If you want silk, the price goes up, way up. I would not pay $4000 for an 8 x 10 wool double knot carpet. I have two 9 X 12 double knots in my home that I paid about $1600 each for, about fifteen years ago. I bought them in Alexandria, VA. I am sure prices have increased since then, but probably not that much.

 

Turkey does have a policy that the government pays for the shipping for tourist, to encourage them to buy carpets. That probably adds something to the cost in any event.

 

Remember, bargain, bargain and bargain some more.

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Also be aware that you might have to pay customs duties when importing an expensive rug. That can be a nasty surprise if you blew the budget on the rug itself already.

 

The carpet merchants in Turkey are pros when it comes to selling to tourists. Make sure you know what you are doing.

Edited by UKBayern

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Also be aware that you might have to pay customs duties when importing an expensive rug. That can be a nasty surprise if you blew the budget on the rug itself already.

 

Nope. Not sure how they side step this, but on both of our rugs they just came to our door…… just about 6 weeks after we purchased them (just as the salesman in Turkey said they would :) ) Son and daughter in law still waiting on the two we bought them a few weeks ago…..

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Bought my Turkman tribal rug 5x6 all wool at the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul. i was referred to the dealer by a US friend who had taught in Istanbul for 10 years and bought their rugs from him before they came home.

I had emailed him and told him when I was coming.

We entered the shop, they closed the door and his assistants bought out the rugs I thought I would like. I walked on them , narrowed down the section to three.After a couple glasses of teas I bought tribal rug. Dealer explained the symbols on the rugs. Also told me to clean it by turning it over and walk on the backs side for a couple of days.:) I still vacuum it though.

I love it, I walk on it every day in my living room. it reminds me of my travels to Turkey.

I knew I could not afford an all silk or even half wool and silk. I paid $720.

they bundled it up and delivered it to my hotel. I carried as part of my carry on on my flight home. I had receipt for customs that it was worth $200. :D

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Texancruzer, I am talking about carrying it through customs yourself, like Azulann did. His salesman was crafty, although I doubt customs would have believed it. They obviously see many receipts for $ 200 :D

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Texancruzer, I am talking about carrying it through customs yourself, like Azulann did. His salesman was crafty, although I doubt customs would have believed it. They obviously see many receipts for $ 200 :D

 

There was no way I was carrying a 10X12' rug :eek: We also bought a smaller 5X7 tribal rug that they rolled up inside the larger one.

 

My guess is that the customs cost is worked into the cost - like the shipping. They say the shipping is free but I am sure they know all their costs when bargaining……

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I bought a 5x8 (appox) rug in Istanbul a few weeks ago for $400. It was wool not silk. They folded it up tight and put it in a nice canvas duffle bag. I was able to put this in my large suitcase to bring home.

 

I also had purchased two rugs in Morocco and had them shipped home. It took a long time to get there and the USPS is terrible in their tracking. They said it was still in Morocco up until the day before it was delivered.

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Thanks for all for the very helpful information.

 

I have done a bunch of research and trying to decide if a good carpet bought in Istanbul was within my budget. Looks like it just might be.

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I actually collect carpets so I have done my research - almost ALL of the carpets now sold in Turkey are made in either China or India - whether hand made or machine made, they are not manufactured or made in Turkey.

 

You need to be very careful about "government sanctioned training schools" where one can see young girls making beautiful carpets - the carpets that they are making are not the same as the carpets being sold by the salesmen that are there to greet you after the demonstration. Those handmade carpets that you see being made are never sold at the "schools".

 

The skill of carpet weaving is a dying art in Turkey. If one is in the market for a REAL handmade Turkish carpet, whether it be wool or silk, I can highly recommend that place that I (and many others agree - check out their reviews on Trip Adviser) buy carpets - Motif Collections in Istanbul. This is a small shop run by two brothers and this is one place you will get the real thing - there is absolutely no pressure whatsoever to buy.

 

gnomie :)

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I am a real sceptic regarding carpets. I have heard so many stories about the carpet being sold to you in the shop is not the one delivered to your door.

 

If I was buying one, then I would definately want to take it with me.

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My husband had several business trips to Turkey 25 years ago which started our interest in collecting rugs. We love them and have spent much time in the intervening years studying and acquiring various types of Oriental carpets. Sadly, oriental rugs are not fashionable at the moment and prices on the used rug market reflect that. At an estate sale my husband recently purchased a magnificent 8 X 10 Iranian heriz rug, that just needed cleaning, for $80 dollars. I guess my point is that prices for new rugs now do not reflect the true market value. So, buy what you love from a reputable dealer and consider it a memento of your trip. Just don't pay much for it.

Edited by lynncarol
typo

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Hard to tell what is real anymore, bought quit a few while living in Saudi at good prices but have seen Persian carpet factories in Italy and Romania.

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Good point. That is why if you are not very familiar with this type of merchandise, you should only buy from a trust-worthy dealer. My husband occasionally acts as a 'picker' for a reputable Oriental rug store in our area and the owner recently confessed he 'can hardly give away' his rugs these days. On the flip side, this is a great time to acquire them on the secondary market.

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Hard to tell what is real anymore, bought quit a few while living in Saudi at good prices but have seen Persian carpet factories in Italy and Romania.

I lived in Saudi Arabia from 81 until 85 and have many oriental carpets.

The machine made carpets are too perfect a weave. Handmade carpets are not so.

My advise on buying carpets was posted above some months ago.

Talk about reputable sellers is funny. ALL carpet dealers will tell you anything to sell you a carpet. That is the culture in that part of the World.

 

Again, I advise shopping for carpets in the USA first to get a sense of what a handmade carpet looks like, thickness, etc. Also, you get a basis for pricing.

Oriental carpets can be purchased in the USA for reasonable prices. AGAIN, be sure to bargain and bargain some more.

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Very much like buying jewelry.  If you really do not know what you are buying the chances or being ripped off are very high.

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In 2011 we paid $2000 for a wool rug at the Carpeterium in Ephesus.  This is a cooperative where they bring women in from the villages and teach them how to weave rugs.  They can then go back to their villages and make rugs to be sold here.  It was a very interesting visit as we watched them making rugs, had a lunch outside and then tea inside.  I've been told there is little markup compared to buying it in Istanbul from one of the carpet merchants.  

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We had booked a private day tour of Ephesus. We ended up with a factory tour  in Seluck with a promise that our tour guide would stay with us and no hard sell.  It was a great experience. Learned a lot with our private tour while sipping Turkish coffee and saw some magnificent rugs. Some upward of 50k.  Loved how they would twirl and present them and they let my girls try their hand and weaving. I did end up purchasing a wool rug, no hard sell in fact I didn’t even bother negotiating and it was $150 for a 4x6. They wrapped it up for us and charged our cc in American dollar so no extra fees from my bank. Who knows the real story but we were told the rug we got was a discount because it had flaws and the sale would benefit the woman who actually made it. The paperwork and certificate says the rug was made in Taspinor?  They did have the names of who made what on the rugs and mine does have a less than perfect slightly bowed side. It’s in my kitchen and I just love it for the beautiful color and pattern. We have some very expensive imported hand me down rugs in our kitchen and the little rug from Turkey actually is the one that people always compliment.  If anything, it’s nice to stand on wool vs a man made material while doing the dishes and cost wise it wasn’t much more than something synthetic and machine made from target.  I love my Turkish rug just because of the wonderful experience I had with the purchase.  I wouldn’t have been comfortable with a large purchase for lack of knowledge. I will say the rug stores we walked past on our own in town had horribly aggressive salesman and we never bothered with them. Idk if they’re just naturally that way or if it was because I was traveling alone with my daughters but our tour guide did pre warn us prior to leaving us and told us not to engage them. 

Edited by littlelulu01

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On ‎12‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 6:33 PM, iancal said:

Very much like buying jewelry.  If you really do not know what you are buying the chances or being ripped off are very high.

Wise words indeed :).   One can easily pay thousands of dollars for a rug that is worth only a few hundred.   The Turks are excellent entrepreneurs and are often quite expert at sizing up their customer and acting accordingly.  Become an expert before you leave home or you may very well be ripped off.

 

Hank

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