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Abbreviations/Acronyms! Look up here before asking.

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54 minutes ago, twodaywonder said:

Most cruise ships have some form of transom stern, but for instance the QM2, Disney Wonder, and the Oasis class ships do not. So what do you call it?

The stern.

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51 minutes ago, twodaywonder said:

This looks like the answer.

A transom, a critical part of the hull, is the wide, usually flat area at the very back of a yacht or boat. This is also where you usually find the name of the yacht.

It may be:

Curved or flat
Vertical
Angling forward
Raked forward (reverse transom or retroussé)
Or angling in the other direction
Transom stern - If the bottom tip of the transom on the waterline.

That's who you're going with for an authoritative answer?  Okay, done here, knew it would get this way.  Study some naval architecture some time.

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Most cruise ships have some form of transom stern, but for instance the QM2, Disney Wonder, and the Oasis class ships do not. So what do you call it?

The stern. really. You just contradicted yourself. You need to read what you said. Your opinion only for an unauthorized answer. 

 

 

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You might want to enlighten yourself. 

The stern is the back side of a ship or boat. It is the exact opposite end of the boat from the bow, or front. The stern is built over a part of the boat known as a sternpost, which is a structural beam over which the transom, or back end, of the ship is built.

(Transom) not stern. 

 

Study some naval architecture some time.

 

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4 minutes ago, twodaywonder said:

You might want to enlighten yourself. 

The stern is the back side of a ship or boat. It is the exact opposite end of the boat from the bow, or front. The stern is built over a part of the boat known as a sternpost, which is a structural beam over which the transom, or back end, of the ship is built.

(Transom) not stern. 

 

Study some naval architecture some time.

 

Try using something other than Wikipedia for your knowledge.  Stern and transom are not the same term, and not all sterns have a transom.  Bye.

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Just now, chengkp75 said:

Try using something other than Wikipedia for your knowledge.  Stern and transom are not the same term, and not all sterns have a transom.  Bye.

True. Glad you learned that.

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4 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

Try using something other than Wikipedia for your knowledge.  Stern and transom are not the same term, and not all sterns have a transom.  Bye.

 

Chengkp...Your maritime knowledge is needed on this thread 🙂  

 

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On 1/18/2020 at 2:18 PM, chengkp75 said:

Well, I know he/she will get upset with me disagreeing with him/her, but saying the "transom" is where the ship's name is painted is not quite correct.  If a boat or ship has a flat or nearly flat vertical (or nearly vertical) surface forming the stern, then that is a transom, but rounded sterns can have the ship's name on them, and they are not transoms.

 

My sailboat had a transom.  But the name was on the sides of the boat near the stern. 

 

Actually, since it had a sail drive fairly far forward (think azipod that does not turn), the names (both sides) may have been on the stern. 😄

 

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twodaywonder, maybe the civilians have different terms for certain things than we do in the Navy...a submarine obviously doesn't have any of these structures that they're talking about. Also on a submarine, the propeller is almost always referred to as the "screw". We have stern planes (depending on the class of boat) and a rudder, and a screw, and that's all on the most afterward part of the boat. To me, all those things would simply be "the stern".  :)

We also don't have decks on submarines, since every compartment where the officers and crew would normally be is below the waterline, with the exception of the superstructure and the sail. So when you go down the Forward Compartment Logistics/Escape Trunk (the main way to enter the forward compartment when you are on the superstructure), you're in Forward Compartment Upper Level. There's Upper Level, 2nd Level, 3rd Level and Lower Level. On a Trident (see my pic above), the superstructure is the structure above the Trident missile tubes. We have to go inside that during refits to clean it out, chip out rust, repaint, etc. Man I hated deck div. One thing that deters me from joining the Merchant Marine or MSC, because most of my sea time wouldn't be counted since we were underwater, so I would be a E-1 seaman recruit all over again...

Knowing how hard some of the work is on a ship is one of the reasons why Flags of Convenience are a big issue to me. I would never want to be on a FoC ship. It sounds like a lot of ship registries, even the good ones, which are NOT Flags of Convenience, like the British and Italian flags, allow their civilian ships to have crew that are not citizens. Of course they are still in a union and the labor laws of the British and Italian governments apply,  so they have to be paid at least minimum wage and the union would require them to be paid a lot more.  At least the US Flag and Japanese Flag both require the crew to be citizens. :)

There's only one Japanese Flag large cruise ship that I know of, the Asuka II. She does world cruises, so I would like to do one aboard that ship someday. :)

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12 hours ago, neutrino78x said:

Knowing how hard some of the work is on a ship is one of the reasons why Flags of Convenience are a big issue to me. I would never want to be on a FoC ship. It sounds like a lot of ship registries, even the good ones, which are NOT Flags of Convenience, like the British and Italian flags, allow their civilian ships to have crew that are not citizens. Of course they are still in a union and the labor laws of the British and Italian governments apply,  so they have to be paid at least minimum wage and the union would require them to be paid a lot more.  At least the US Flag and Japanese Flag both require the crew to be citizens. 🙂

The first part of this paragraph would indicate to me that you don't cruise much, since the vast majority of cruise ships are registered under flags of convenience.  Further, foreign mariners on UK flagged ships are not subject to UK minimum wage laws, unless they reside in the UK.  In Italy, there is no national minimum wage, they are set by CBA's (collective bargaining agreements) between employers and unions.  In both cases, foreign maritime workers are not represented by unions in the UK or Italy, but by unions in their home countries.  These "unions" tend to be in reality merely "employment agencies".  And, as for the "union would require them to be paid a lot more" than the minimum wage, let me give you an example.  When the Norwegian Sky first reflagged as the US flag Pride of Aloha, to start NCL's US flag operations, the contract negotiated with the Seafarer's International Union (SIU), the largest US maritime unlicensed union, was such that the overtime rate for deck and engine crew was $0.35 less per hour than the straight time rate.  US labor laws require overtime to be paid at 50% more than regular time, unless otherwise specified by a CBA.

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On 2/3/2020 at 3:15 AM, chengkp75 said:

The first part of this paragraph would indicate to me that you don't cruise much, since the vast majority of cruise ships are registered under flags of convenience. [/quote]

 

Exactly my point, shipmate. I would only cruise on ships which do not fly Flags of Convenience.

You are/were a US Merchant Mariner so you should be among the first to criticize this practice. As a Navy man I would never condone or support it in any way. Life is hard aboard ship, and I do not support any effort to make it easier to treat the crew badly or not pay them well.

 

https://www.itfglobal.org/en/sector/seafarers/flags-of-convenience

 

Britain is not a FoC, nor is ours, that of the USA, or that of Norway or Italy. The Bahamas is an example of a FoC and I would never ride on a ship flying under that flag.

 

Edited by neutrino78x

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5 hours ago, neutrino78x said:

 

Exactly my point, shipmate. I would only cruise on ships which do not fly Flags of Convenience.

You are/were a US Merchant Mariner so you should be among the first to criticize this practice. As a Navy man I would never condone or support it in any way. Life is hard aboard ship, and I do not support any effort to make it easier to treat the crew badly or not pay them well.

 

https://www.itfglobal.org/en/sector/seafarers/flags-of-convenience

 

Britain is not a FoC, nor is ours, that of the USA, or that of Norway or Italy. The Bahamas is an example of a FoC and I would never ride on a ship flying under that flag.

 

While I advocate strongly for a strong US flag merchant marine, I am enough of a realist to know that flags of convenience are a fact of life that will not go away.  Over half of the world's shipping tonnage flies a flag of convenience.  And, while FOC's are protested by labor unions in developed countries for not paying their seamen well, with the exception of a few very small FOC nations, the major players have all ratified the Manila Labor Convention, and are required to pay their seamen at rates set by the IMO and the ILO, which means that the nations providing the seamen for the FOC ships have agreed that this is the minimum wage they are comfortable with, and it falls to those nations, even the developed nations to decide that the MLC needs reform if they feel that pay is not sufficient.

 

And, unfortunately, the US brought on the floodgate of FOC use, when during WWI we encouraged US shipowners to reflag to Panama in order to carry US aid to the Allies without being brought into the war by using US flagged bottoms to bring war materials.  Further, the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, while it accomplished it's goal of preparing the US for WWII by increasing our merchant marine via construction and operating subsidies, is also the single most important factor in the subsequent decline of the US merchant marine, as the operating subsidy allowed the shipowner to pass on to the US government the difference in cost to operate a ship as a US flag ship over a foreign flag ship.  This led US maritime labor unions to request more and more pay increases (without regard to whether the crew was adding more to the "value" of the shipping process, or whether they were learning new skills to increase productivity), and the shipowners would blithely accede to the increases, since they were simply passed to the US taxpayer.  The construction subsidies and operating subsidies caused our industries to stick to old fashioned technology, because it was cheaper than developing new technology that would save money long term, because the cost of the inefficient technology and larger, higher paid, less talented crew would be passed to the taxpayer.

 

As to which nations are FOC or not, just know that countries like Germany and France have a second "international registry" that flies the national flag, and uses ports of registry in the home country just like their "national" registry, but this second registry is considered to be a FOC.  In addition to Germany and France, there are second registries in Italy, Denmark, and Norway, and these second registries are merely attempts by these nations to recover vessel registration fees from shipowners who have used FOC's, and most allow labor practices that would be otherwise illegal in that country.

 

But, this is not a discussion for this thread.

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5 hours ago, neutrino78x said:

 

Exactly my point, shipmate. I would only cruise on ships which do not fly Flags of Convenience.

You are/were a US Merchant Mariner so you should be among the first to criticize this practice. As a Navy man I would never condone or support it in any way. Life is hard aboard ship, and I do not support any effort to make it easier to treat the crew badly or not pay them well.

 

https://www.itfglobal.org/en/sector/seafarers/flags-of-convenience

 

Britain is not a FoC, nor is ours, that of the USA, or that of Norway or Italy. The Bahamas is an example of a FoC and I would never ride on a ship flying under that flag.

 

While I advocate strongly for a strong US flag merchant marine, I am enough of a realist to know that flags of convenience are a fact of life that will not go away.  Over half of the world's shipping tonnage flies a flag of convenience.  And, while FOC's are protested by labor unions in developed countries for not paying their seamen well, with the exception of a few very small FOC nations, the major players have all ratified the Manila Labor Convention, and are required to pay their seamen at rates set by the IMO and the ILO, which means that the nations providing the seamen for the FOC ships have agreed that this is the minimum wage they are comfortable with, and it falls to those nations, even the developed nations to decide that the MLC needs reform if they feel that pay is not sufficient.

 

And, unfortunately, the US brought on the floodgate of FOC use, when during WWI we encouraged US shipowners to reflag to Panama in order to carry US aid to the Allies without being brought into the war by using US flagged bottoms to bring war materials.  Further, the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, while it accomplished it's goal of preparing the US for WWII by increasing our merchant marine via construction and operating subsidies, is also the single most important factor in the subsequent decline of the US merchant marine, as the operating subsidy allowed the shipowner to pass on to the US government the difference in cost to operate a ship as a US flag ship over a foreign flag ship.  This led US maritime labor unions to request more and more pay increases (without regard to whether the crew was adding more to the "value" of the shipping process, or whether they were learning new skills to increase productivity), and the shipowners would blithely accede to the increases, since they were simply passed to the US taxpayer.  The construction subsidies and operating subsidies caused our industries to stick to old fashioned technology, because it was cheaper than developing new technology that would save money long term, because the cost of the inefficient technology and larger, higher paid, less talented crew would be passed to the taxpayer.

 

As to which nations are FOC or not, just know that countries like Germany and France have a second "international registry" that flies the national flag, and uses ports of registry in the home country just like their "national" registry, but this second registry is considered to be a FOC.  In addition to Germany and France, there are second registries in Italy, Denmark, and Norway, and these second registries are merely attempts by these nations to recover vessel registration fees from shipowners who have used FOC's, and most allow labor practices that would be otherwise illegal in that country.

 

But, this is not a discussion for this thread.

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FCC? Mentioned when discussing refunds on Carnival. 
 

Thanks 

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5 hours ago, Miss_Reb said:

FCC? Mentioned when discussing refunds on Carnival. 
 

Thanks 

Future Cruise Credit

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Posted (edited)
On 1/30/2018 at 7:12 AM, Kreiven said:

 

FTTF - Faster To The Fun (check Carnival's website for more information)

 

LOL.....  Maybe we'll see new ones. How about MASDR...."masking and social distancing required" 

 

Andy and Cheng....thought one of you guys would have added GRT to the list (gross registered tonnage). And then there's SS  (steamship) and MS (motor ship) 

 

Let's not forget what is probably one of everybody's favorites....OBC  (onboard credit)!

Edited by OnTheJourney

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On 7/20/2020 at 12:19 PM, OnTheJourney said:

Andy and Cheng....thought one of you guys would have added GRT to the list (gross registered tonnage). And then there's SS  (steamship) and MS (motor ship)

Well, GRT is an archaic term, not used since the '80's, when GT (Gross Tonnage) became the standard of measurement.

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On 7/22/2020 at 3:20 AM, chengkp75 said:

Well, GRT is an archaic term, not used since the '80's, when GT (Gross Tonnage) became the standard of measurement.

 

Affirmative, GT or NT (Net Tonnage) is what we have used for many years.

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Made me smile that something from the '80's is considered archaic!  Haha.  How time flies.  

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Perhaps a new acronym could be helpful to describe posters who resist knowledgeable answers:

 

NATURE   -  - Not Able To Understand Reasonable Explanations.

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On 10/12/2020 at 12:51 PM, ldubs said:

Made me smile that something from the '80's is considered archaic!  Haha.  How time flies.  

 

LOL!  Good point!  

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On 10/17/2020 at 2:58 PM, navybankerteacher said:

Perhaps a new acronym could be helpful to describe posters who resist knowledgeable answers:

 

NATURE   -  - Not Able To Understand Reasonable Explanations.

 

Well now, I could delve into the political arena on this one, but won't..... 😉

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