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Woobstr112G

I Want a New Canon DSLR

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I am looking for a replacement for my Canon 70D.  I would like to have it by the time for my cruise on the new Sky Princess in November.  I wanted to stay with an APS-C camera due to the money I have invested in my lens collection.  I was hoping Canon would release the 90D, but now I don't know if they'll ever release it.  With this in mind, I would very much appreciate some advice on what might be a good replacement for my 70D.

 

Thanks in advance for any replies.....

 

Bob

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What is it that you seek in a new camera?

 

Do consider the EOS R or RP. Both of these natively use "RF" lenses, but there's a Canon adapter available that will use EF and EF-S lenses, so you can continue to use your existing lenses. The R has the same sensor as the 5D Mark IV, and has a lot of promise. Canon is also clearly investing in the development of lots of RF-mount lenses, as the RF mount (and the fact that the R series is mirrorless) opens up a lot of options. I will mention though that the ergonomics of the R are quite different than the Canon DSLRs, so you may not like that. I'm fairly set with DSLRs, but the R is our next camera purchase.

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Waiting to hear more on this thread as to how the EF-S lenses work with the adapter

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57 minutes ago, mskaufman said:

Waiting to hear more on this thread as to how the EF-S lenses work with the adapter

The image is cropped down to the APS-C portion of the sensor but otherwise everything's 100% hunky dory.

 

Full-frame DSLRs have to be made in such a way that there's room for the mirror to flip up. APS-C cameras have a smaller sensor and can use a smaller mirror, but of course the overall mirror box dimensions stay the same. Hence, less clearance is needed for the mirror, and as a result, most if not all EF-S lenses protrude into the body a bit. That protrusion allows the designers new latitude with the overall design, saving weight and cost, as many lenses have a "reverse telephoto group" at the back to project the image to the sensor.

 

Mirrorless cameras have no mirror, and hence the RF mount is engineered to be significantly closer to the sensor (the camera has less physical depth). The engineers can make new designs without the constraint of the mirror, and the smaller profile means there's plenty of room for the RF-EF adapter while keeping the EF/EF-S mount lenses at the right distance away from the sensor to match their original design criteria.

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Ef-s lenses are not worth using on FF. While they are fully functional on the R and RP as far as autofocus, since you’re applying a 1.6 crop, you end up with a fairly low resolution image — about 10-12mp on the Canon R, lower on the RP.

 

That might be fine in a pinch, but you wouldn’t want to make it a habit.  Makes the entire camera a waste.  The 70d would give better IQ and better performance than the R with ef-s lenses. (It becomes a 10mp aps-c camera with mediocre performance). 

 

Though cant say anything with certainty, I strongly believe a replacement for the 80D and/or 7dii is coming this year. Might be the last high-end dslr but it’s coming. 

 

You can also consider adapting your lenses to the M50.  Using EF-s lenses on the m50 makes more sense than using them on the R/RP. 

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43 minutes ago, havoc315 said:

Ef-s lenses are not worth using on FF. While they are fully functional on the R and RP as far as autofocus, since you’re applying a 1.6 crop, you end up with a fairly low resolution image — about 10-12mp on the Canon R, lower on the RP.

 

That might be fine in a pinch, but you wouldn’t want to make it a habit.  Makes the entire camera a waste.  The 70d would give better IQ and better performance than the R with ef-s lenses. (It becomes a 10mp aps-c camera with mediocre performance). 

 

Though cant say anything with certainty, I strongly believe a replacement for the 80D and/or 7dii is coming this year. Might be the last high-end dslr but it’s coming. 

 

You can also consider adapting your lenses to the M50.  Using EF-s lenses on the m50 makes more sense than using them on the R/RP. 

I disagree that it's a waste - it's a great way to bridge into new technology, it's a great way to bridge into full frame without having to start nearly "lensless", and the AF is going to be significantly better than what you'd find in a two-digit Canon DSLR.

 

I've also said for a long time that many full-frame lenses (and some crop lenses) are "built with a use in mind" - the 85/1.2 was designed to be a portrait lens, but when mounted on an APS-C camera it behaves as though it was a 135mm (or nearly so), changing the framing or subject distance from how it was designed. Likewise, the EF-S 10-22 was designed to be an APS-C equivalent for a 16-35 wide-angle. The EF-RF adapter provides a great bridge here: the 10-22 would work like a 16-35 on the R/RP, but if/when the owner decides to get a 16-35, they get the same experience they were used to but with more pixels (and IMHO less distortion as the FF lenses are built better).

 

Canon Rumors posted a "CR1" spec list for a 90D today. Although they're saying it's not a 7D3, I'd argue that the specs look a lot like a 7D3 to me. As far as the last high-end DSLR, I find that doubtful as the rumor mill says there's a 1Dx Mark III being tested in the wild so it's ready for Olympics 2020 in Tokyo.

 

I personally think MILC (mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras) are the way of the future. Lens R&D seems to have swung significantly toward the world of MILC lenses, and the ability to show in the viewfinder what the final image should (roughly) look like is a usability feature that aligns well with the world around us.

 

To the OP: what lenses do you have presently?

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I meant last high end aps-c dslr.... I fully expect a 1dx3.  A 5d5 is possible. But I doubt we will see a 7d4 hitting shelves in 2025. 

 

The AF in the R/RF is different than the af in the 70d... some ways worse, some ways better. It’s the difference between on sensor DPAF as opposed to tradition mirror based phase detection. 

Its extremely accurate and very smooth for video. But not necessarily as fast as traditional phase detect. The Canon 70d can shoot 7 fps with servo AF. The Canon R is limited to 5fps with servo and only 3fps with tracking priority. 

 

When upgrading, you need to ask yourself what you’re gaining. Sure, using EF-S lenses for a couple weeks while new lenses are in the mail... using an occasional ef-s lens to plug a whole...

 

But if you’re going to primarily use ef-s lenses for any prolonged time, you’re really not getting any benefit from upgrading except some video upgrades. 

 

-You’re moving to a different af system that is better in some ways, worse in others. 

-you’re moving to worse battery life 

-moving to a slower burst rate

-moving down significantly in resolution to camera phone resolution 

-not getting any real IQ upgrade.  (Improved IQ comes from using the entire FF sensor... use only the Aps-c middle of the sensor, you get only aps-c image quality). 

 

You’re gaining an EVF, losing an OVF, and getting 4K video.  

 

The 80d would be a better and cheaper upgrade.... if you’re sticking to ef-s lenses. 

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11 hours ago, peety3 said:

I disagree that it's a waste - it's a great way to bridge into new technology, it's a great way to bridge into full frame without having to start nearly "lensless", and the AF is going to be significantly better than what you'd find in a two-digit Canon DSLR.

 

I've also said for a long time that many full-frame lenses (and some crop lenses) are "built with a use in mind" - the 85/1.2 was designed to be a portrait lens, but when mounted on an APS-C camera it behaves as though it was a 135mm (or nearly so), changing the framing or subject distance from how it was designed. Likewise, the EF-S 10-22 was designed to be an APS-C equivalent for a 16-35 wide-angle. The EF-RF adapter provides a great bridge here: the 10-22 would work like a 16-35 on the R/RP, but if/when the owner decides to get a 16-35, they get the same experience they were used to but with more pixels (and IMHO less distortion as the FF lenses are built better).

 

Canon Rumors posted a "CR1" spec list for a 90D today. Although they're saying it's not a 7D3, I'd argue that the specs look a lot like a 7D3 to me. As far as the last high-end DSLR, I find that doubtful as the rumor mill says there's a 1Dx Mark III being tested in the wild so it's ready for Olympics 2020 in Tokyo.

 

I personally think MILC (mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras) are the way of the future. Lens R&D seems to have swung significantly toward the world of MILC lenses, and the ability to show in the viewfinder what the final image should (roughly) look like is a usability feature that aligns well with the world around us.

 

To the OP: what lenses do you have presently?

I have the following:

15x85

28x135

10x22

70x200

 

The 15x85 is my everyday day walk around lens.   They are all Canon lenses.  I consider my self an  amateur enthusiast.  When I retire next year I plan on taking some classes to become a better photographer.

 

Bob

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48 minutes ago, Woobstr112G said:

I have the following:

15x85

28x135

10x22

70x200

 

The 15x85 is my everyday day walk around lens.   They are all Canon lenses.  I consider my self an  amateur enthusiast.  When I retire next year I plan on taking some classes to become a better photographer.

 

Bob

I remember the days of being an amateur enthusiast. 🙂 The 28-135 and 70-200 will both work to the full potential with a full-frame DSLR or an EOS R or RP. The 15-85 would be relatively redundant alongside the 28-135 (the 28-135 would be the better choice) if you got an EOS R or RP, so if you were planning to sell your 70D, you could certainly sell it with the 15-85. The 10-22 would serve your wide angle needs in the short term if you got an EOS R or RP, and would behave like a 16-35 just like it did on your 70D. Best wishes in your research and decision; as much as we all wish the manufacturers would be more open with what their plans are, I also realize there's huge amounts of money to be made or lost by being too public with product designs and timelines. 🙂

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I was in a similar ship - started with the original Digital Rebel, went to the 40D then the 70D.

I wanted to upgrade and kept looking at the Sony a7III. Everyone said how great of a camera it was - I went to buy it, picked it up and it didn't feel right in my hands. My fingers kept bunching up. I looked at the 80D and the 7DMk2 but I ended up buying the EOS R right before the RP was announced and fell in love with it. The ability to pick any focus point (like the Sony mirrorless cameras) was great and it was nice to be able to start to use L series lenses. I think mirrorless is the future too so it was nice to get on that train.

Having said that, playing with the EOS RP - same form factor, slightly smaller.

If you want to wait for the 90D though, the rumored spec sheet looks great - https://www.canonrumors.com/canon-eos-90d-specification-list-cr1/

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Upgrade is total GAS, be sure your current camera isn't delivering.   I found I probably could have survived and got equally great images with three generations ago camera for the most part

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Posted (edited)
On 5/13/2019 at 9:46 PM, Woobstr112G said:

I am looking for a replacement for my Canon 70D.  I would like to have it by the time for my cruise on the new Sky Princess in November.  I wanted to stay with an APS-C camera due to the money I have invested in my lens collection.  I was hoping Canon would release the 90D, but now I don't know if they'll ever release it.  With this in mind, I would very much appreciate some advice on what might be a good replacement for my 70D.

 

Thanks in advance for any replies.....

 

Bob

I have the 7D Mark II, it is a crop and has the advantage of having a high burst rate if you are trying to get pictures of wildlife in motion.  It is a very versatile camera and it accepts the LP-E6 or LP-E6N battery packs.

 

I find it is a great camera overall, it has built in GPS and bluetooth if you need those options.  It has two card slots, CF and SD.  With the last firmware update you can even use the new Canon Wifi Card in it if you need that, though you loose the SD slot for memory and are only left with the CF. 

 

The new EOS-R camera comes with an adapter that you can use you EFS and EF lenses with apparently, if you are going to be outside in weather I would not buy the EOS-RP as it does not use gaskets for weather sealing, they do say it is weatherproof but not sure how well without the gaskets..

Edited by mrell345

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