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Kiwi Kruzer

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There were schemes to get out of people out of Europe after WWII for many countries, taking them to Canada, Brazil, the US, Australia, NZ and even South Africa.

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44 minutes ago, MicCanberra said:

There were schemes to get out of people out of Europe after WWII for many countries, taking them to Canada, Brazil, the US, Australia, NZ and even South Africa.

In the case of Australia, our government wanted to increase the population - not get the people out of Europe.  After the scare during the Second World War where people feared an invasion by Japan, a government slogan was "Populate or Perish". The Aussie government preferred Brits, but the British government limited the number of people it would allow to leave.

 

A few years after the end of the war, the Australian migration scheme was extended to include people from 'mainland' Europe. The result was a lot of migrants from Italy and Greece. The Australian government still preferred people from Britain because they felt they would integrate better. In 1957, they launched a new immigration programme with its advertising slogan "Bring Out A Briton".

 

Although the Aust government preferred its new immigrants to come from the UK, this group had the highest rate of return - around 25%. It is pretty clear that many of the migrants came for what they saw as a cheap working holiday, although many of those who had that in mind, found the living conditions so much better in Australia, that they stayed.

Edited by Aus Traveller

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2 hours ago, Kiwi Kruzer said:

 

Was it still   £10 in 82 ?    

My brother in law came out in the late 70s and he was £10.

 

Ive offered him double to back.

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2 hours ago, Aus Traveller said:

In the case of Australia, our government wanted to increase the population - not get the people out of Europe.  After the scare during the Second World War where people feared an invasion by Japan, a government slogan was "Populate or Perish". The Aussie government preferred Brits, but the British government limited the number of people it would allow to leave.

 

A few years after the end of the war, the Australian migration scheme was extended to include people from 'mainland' Europe. The result was a lot of migrants from Italy and Greece. The Australian government still preferred people from Britain because they felt they would integrate better. In 1957, they launched a new immigration programme with its advertising slogan "Bring Out A Briton".

 

Although the Aust government preferred its new immigrants to come from the UK, this group had the highest rate of return - around 25%. It is pretty clear that many of the migrants came for what they saw as a cheap working holiday, although many of those who had that in mind, found the living conditions so much better in Australia, that they stayed.

Australia still has a similar policy, they want immigrants to come here but only from certain countries.

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3 hours ago, Aus Traveller said:

In the case of Australia, our government wanted to increase the population - not get the people out of Europe.  After the scare during the Second World War where people feared an invasion by Japan, a government slogan was "Populate or Perish". The Aussie government preferred Brits, but the British government limited the number of people it would allow to leave.

 

A few years after the end of the war, the Australian migration scheme was extended to include people from 'mainland' Europe. The result was a lot of migrants from Italy and Greece. The Australian government still preferred people from Britain because they felt they would integrate better. In 1957, they launched a new immigration programme with its advertising slogan "Bring Out A Briton".

 

Although the Aust government preferred its new immigrants to come from the UK, this group had the highest rate of return - around 25%. It is pretty clear that many of the migrants came for what they saw as a cheap working holiday, although many of those who had that in mind, found the living conditions so much better in Australia, that they stayed.

I went to a Lake Macquarie primary school in the fifties. There were a lot of post war migrants in my year. There were a few from Italy, Yugoslavia, Latvia, Denmark but non from Greece (maybe they all went to Melbourne). The majority by far were from Germany including some of my close mates. Oh, I almost forgot, there were a couple of poms too.

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17 hours ago, lyndarra said:

I went to a Lake Macquarie primary school in the fifties. There were a lot of post war migrants in my year. There were a few from Italy, Yugoslavia, Latvia, Denmark but non from Greece (maybe they all went to Melbourne). The majority by far were from Germany including some of my close mates. Oh, I almost forgot, there were a couple of poms too.

Some of those, particularly those from Latvia and Germany, would have been categorised as 'Displaced Persons'. Australia took the highest percentage of these people who couldn't return to their homes for reasons related to the war. These were separate from the £10 immigration scheme.

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17 hours ago, lyndarra said:

I went to a Lake Macquarie primary school in the fifties. There were a lot of post war migrants in my year. There were a few from Italy, Yugoslavia, Latvia, Denmark but non from Greece (maybe they all went to Melbourne). The majority by far were from Germany including some of my close mates. Oh, I almost forgot, there were a couple of poms too.

I went to Wangi Primary a bit later and we had a lot of different nationalities, in a school of about 100 students, many whose family had come out to work on building the power station, I guess mainly Italians, Greeks and French.

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4 hours ago, Aus Traveller said:

Some of those, particularly those from Latvia and Germany, would have been categorised as 'Displaced Persons'. Australia took the highest percentage of these people who couldn't return to their homes for reasons related to the war. These were separate from the £10 immigration scheme.

I suppose they were just trying to get them out of Europe.

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12 minutes ago, MicCanberra said:

I suppose they were just trying to get them out of Europe.

Yes. They could no longer go back to their homeland, often because they fought on the 'other' side. Many from territory that was now controlled by the USSR would have faced a dire fate. Following the agreement at Yalta between USA, Britain and USSR, citizens of USSR (including Ukraine) who were outside its borders at the end of the war were to be returned, by force if necessary. They faced a very bleak future - many, if not all who were returned, were eliminated because they had been 'exposed' to the West. (Don't get me started on this issue).

 

Those who managed to escape, made their way to Displaced Persons' Camps, some in Southern Germany and Italy. Countries who could take some did so, including Australia who wanted to build up its population. The government also wanted workers to build the infrastructure of the Snowy Rivers Scheme.

Edited by Aus Traveller

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18 hours ago, Aus Traveller said:

Yes. They could no longer go back to their homeland, often because they fought on the 'other' side. Many from territory that was now controlled by the USSR would have faced a dire fate. Following the agreement at Yalta between USA, Britain and USSR, citizens of USSR (including Ukraine) who were outside its borders at the end of the war were to be returned, by force if necessary. They faced a very bleak future - many, if not all who were returned, were eliminated because they had been 'exposed' to the West. (Don't get me started on this issue).

 

Those who managed to escape, made their way to Displaced Persons' Camps, some in Southern Germany and Italy. Countries who could take some did so, including Australia who wanted to build up its population. The government also wanted workers to build the infrastructure of the Snowy Rivers Scheme.

Yes, I know of a young single couple who were taken from Poland to Germany to work on farms.  They married in Germany.  After the war, they worked for Britain in Germany, so couldn't go back to Poland.  They could have gone to a couple of countries, but chose to emigrate to Australia and neither saw their parents and siblings again.  They were always sad that they didn't go back first to see their family, but we learnt that those who did were treated badly by Russians/put in gaol etc.  I accompanied their daughter back to meet all her elderly aunts and uncles in Poland - What a family celebration! 

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