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Davis2010

First Time FLYER...Help

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I join the other truly wise posters in encouraging you to fly in at least a day prior to your cruise.

No one has asked what time your ship sails. If it is in the afternoon 3:00 to 4:00 you are in a precariously tight corridor. Let's say you land at 11:15. You walk to baggage claim and wait for you luggage. Now it's closer to noon. You grab a cab and take the 30 - 40+ minute drive from the airport across town to the pier. But wait...your flight is late or there are traffic issues and you have to be on board 90 minutes before sail away. It's chancy. 

I wouldn't do it anyway because Seattle is such a wonderful city. To me it's a destination equal to the great Alaska itinerary.

Just consider that many of us have cruised 10, 20, 50 times and you came to Cruise Critic because of our experiences. Trust us and either cancel the Princess Air and book your own or change your flights to at least the day before.

 

As far as air travel. All the advice is great. Planes do make unique noises that could give you an uneasy feeling. The landing gear retracting upon takeoff and extending upon landing is one example of unfamiliar noise. Not all planes loud speaker systems are efficient and you may miss announcements. Ask questions of the crew (flight attendants.)

 

Familiarize yourselves with TSA protocol and unfortunately be aware that the world situation may make security at every airport more difficult and lengthier. Take this from someone returning from a cruise to New York City the day we bombed Afghanistan following 9/11.

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10 hours ago, Twickenham said:

Cruisers are frequently urged to fly in a day before embarkation, but this really is a situation where it's virtually a must, as there's very little room for error and a delayed flight could mean missing your entire cruise.

 

Beyond the PVSA issue, I'm concerned that your connection in Dallas is only about an hour and 15 minutes if I read correctly.   Since they close the boarding door about 10 min prior to scheduled departure, that means it's really only about an hour and 5 minutes.  If your plane takes off on time from Jacksonville, that shouldn't be a problem.  The Dallas airport is big but unless you have restricted mobility you can make it.  The issue is that planes have minor delays for all kinds of reasons, and a delay of 15-60 minutes is completely possible.  Could be a minor mechanical issue, could be weather at JAX, could be that the crew arrived late the night before and needs to meet mandatory crew rest before flying again etc.  I'm not trying to scare you; I book 1 hour connections all the time, but not on cruise departure day!  I don't know much about Princess EZ Air specifically, but if the flights aren't paid for you can probably change them without a fee.  Your TA needs to get you rebooked to the day before.

 

9 hours ago, Davis2010 said:

I'll be honest with you. This post is freaking me out a bit. Our TA has assured us we will be fine with all the plans she has scheduled for us. 

 

With all due respect, your TA is an idiot.  She's counting on a best case scenario.  I mean, who in their right mind books a first time flyer to go all the way across the country on the day of departure with a connection of just over an hour?!  

 

9 hours ago, Peg_S said:

 Princess' EZAIR site says "Rest easy that you'll make your cruise if flights are delayed or canceled..." so there is some type of "backup plan" thru Princess, though I don't know the details.

 

 

Yes, the back up plan is that you call them and they rebook you.  But if you've cut it so tight that there are no other flights that get you there in time to board the ship, there isn't much they can do but refund your cruise and send you home.  As has been pointed out, due to PVSA regulations, this particular itinerary is not one where you can just be sent on to the first port of call to join the ship.

 

9 hours ago, FlyerTalker said:

The good news is that there are a few other AA flights that could get you out of JAX and into SEA before 1pm.  But you wouldn't want anything later, as your ship departs at 4pm and you need to be aboard well before that.

 

 

Keep in mind that if the ship departs at 4pm, the all aboard cutoff time is probably 3pm.  OP- that's because they need to finalize the passenger manifest before sailing.

 

9 hours ago, FlyerTalker said:

 

Yes...just what are those backup plans?  Because there really aren't any.  There's a bunch of marketing spin that Princess is there to make everything right, but when you look at the actual terms & conditions, you won't find any kind of guarantee.

 

Thought problem:  There are no seats available to get the passengers from JAX to the ship.  Do you think that Princess will hustle up a Gulfstream-V to whisk them to Seattle?

 

Exactly.  Princess cannot manufacture flights out of thin air, nor can they manufacture available seats.  So even if there's another flight that gets you there on time, what will you do if that flight doesn't have 2 available seats?   And no, the airline won't take pity on you and kick other pax off in order to get you to your cruise.

 

8 hours ago, Davis2010 said:

Our flights we currently have booked have us landing in SEA at 11:15AM. Would that be sufficient?

 

Yes, but that isn't the issue.  The issue, as I see it, is that you have a short connection in Dallas, so if you're delayed getting our of JAX, you have a problem.  

 

Now that the OP has been sufficiently scared, (not my intention or anyone else's here, but flying day of is a big risk, especially with a short connection AND on an Alaska/PVSA cruise), let me address your initial question of what to expect.   You've gotten some good info but for someone who has never ever flown before, you've got 4 key things to prepare for:  check in, security, boarding, connecting.

1.  Check in:  Typically you can either check in and check bags at the counter or sometimes outside with a sky cap. Or you can check in at a kiosk and then get in a line that is just for bag check.  You'll need ID for each passenger (unless kids are involved), and it's helpful to have the 6 digit record locator.  If your TA can't give you the locator # or can't explain to you how to get it, then make a note to fire her and never use her again.  Sorry, but I'm already appalled at her cavalier attitude toward your itinerary, especially with you being a first time flyer.  Anyway, you'll be given a boarding pass for each flight segment or each person, so 2 per person in your case.  Don't lose them.  You'll also be given a claim sticker for each checked bag.  These are usually stuck on the back of the 2nd boarding pass.  You'll need that in the event you get to SEA and one of your checked bags does not make it.  Proceed to security.

 

2.  At security, each person needs to show government issued photo ID (except children) and a boarding pass.   Then, unless you luck into getting PreCheck, you will be in a regular line.  You have to take off shoes, belts, jackets.  You have to remove laptops from your carry on bag, and remove liquids which need to be packed in a 3-1-1- bag.  If you have questions about the 3-1-1- bag, ask here.  Remove everything from pockets.  Small items go in a bin, carry on bag itself can go right on the conveyor belt.  You'll go through the scanner and retrieve you belongings from the other side.  As soon as you go through, make sure you can put your hands on your ID, wallet and boarding passes immediately; this is the time to realize if you've forgotten or misplaced anything!  Proceed to the gat.

 

3.  Boarding will be by zone.  Every airline does it a little differently, but first class pax, high status pax (airline loyalty program), pax needing extra time/wheelchairs, and families with carseats/strollers are generally the first called.  Then the airline continues zone by zone.  Your boarding zone will be printed on your boarding pass, and if flying coach with no airline loyalty, you'll likely be the last or next to last zone called.  This means that even though you're allowed to bring a carry on suitcase, you may need to gate check it if the overhead bins on the plane are full.  This is very common on fully booked flights.  You can gate check at no charge; they'll tag your bag, your take it to the jetway and leave it there just before boarding the aircraft, and retrieve it at your final destination at baggage claim with your other checked bags.  Your boarding pass will show your seat numbers.  Ask a flight attendant for help finding your row and seat. 

 

4.  At Dallas, there should be a monitor just inside the terminal where your gate is that shows the gate for all pax on that flight with connections.  Ask a gate agent to help with directions to your gate.

 

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Also,  it's a DFW connection so it's an American flight, and their operational reliability is a bit of a hot mess right now. 

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I agree with the prior posts so I will not duplicate but want to add some additional thoughts:

 

—You can go to the Princess website and look at your specific cruise. It will allow you to see all of the available flights from your home to Seattle and back. You can see pricing too. With this information, you can see if you got the best options or not. If you decide to change your flight to the day before or another time or another flight or if the price drops...YOU can phone Princess and make the change without using your TA. (I book Princess cruises with a TA for the perks but make my own air arrangements; payment for the EZ Air flights are still made through the TA; I’ve often gotten lower prices by watching prices)

 

—With EZ Air, the flight tickets are not booked at final payment but something like 40 days out. Please look at the Princess website to get the specifics yourself and do not totally rely on the TA to know the information: trust but verify.

 

—Last season, there was a LOT of road construction in Seattle which could significantly increase the drive time from the airport to the ship. One of the great things about Princess is the main dining room is open for embarkation luncheon!! But it closes at 1pm and you would miss it based on your flight arrival time. And though you’ll receive info from Princess with specific boarding times based on the deck your cabin is on, that is only a suggestion and you can board earlier.

 

—Though we have flown a lot in our lives and have been to some airports multiple times, I still look up the airport to see the layout for the airline I’m flying, where baggage claim is, if there is a tram or not, what amenities are available near the gate, etc. It’s also handy to know where the security lines are located in relation to ticketing (where you check your bags); sometimes the airport points out that some security is open on during specific hours or some have shorter lines.

 

—DO read your airline’s website for details on how they work and what to expect. Not only will it answer your baggage questions but tell you about snacks, beverages, and/or food available on the flight; what is free/what cost extra and if they only take credit card or if cash is OK. You can find out entertainment options (screen on the back of the seat in front of you or do you use your own device); will you need to download an app in advance in order to use their system, and lots more about what to expect on your trip.

 

 

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A few ideas:

  • Become familiar with all your airports. Here is Jacksonville's website http://www.flyjacksonville.com/Home.aspx?sMP=JIA Also do a search for u-tube videos so you have a visual. Go to your home airport and see where you have to check-in etc. Looks like Jacksonville has an Ambassador program --it's under customer service on the website. 
  • Do the same on the American Airlines website. Check out the type of planes you are flying on. Loads of visuals to see the planes interior. Make sure your luggage meets the measurement and weight requirements for the airline -- and that includes wheels! Do not overstuff bags as it changes their measurements. The Alaska forum on Cruise Critic will give you ideas of what's essential to bring. 
  • Do not be surprised if your flights change a few times--times, type of plane, connection times. It's why going a day early gives you breathing room -- we regard it as part of our vacation. Follow the flights yourself on the AA website as well as in your cruise personalizer

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Most importantly put everything that you cannot be without -- meds, etc -- in your carry-on bag or personal bag. I also like to keep my walking shoes and swimsuit with me -- very hard to replace!

 

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Security is the most confusing part of the whole thing. You'll have to take your shoes off, along with any belts and jackets. You'll have to empty your pockets. Any liquids you bring need to be 3 oz or less - and they all have to fit in a QUART size ziplock bag. You'll pull that bag out of your carry-on, along with any lap tops or tablets. 

 

There are TSA agents present. Listen to what they tell you to do, and don't be afraid to ask questions.

 

Now you'll walk through the scanner.

 

On the other side of the scanner, you'll collect your things, put it all back together, and find the waiting area for your flight.

 

IMPORTANT!  Make sure you have everything before leaving the security area. You have the boarding ticket. You have your passport. You have your electronics. It's easy to feel really frazzled and forget things. So, take a minute, breathe, and make sure you have everything.

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Just to add a few things about the actual flight experience itself...

 

I don't know if it's been mentioned above, but the time for your flight is the time it is scheduled to take off. Boarding of the airplane is usually 30-40 minutes prior to that time. Boarding is done in groups, starting with the First Class and frequent fliers. Your boarding pass will tell you what group you are boarding group you are in. Boarding usually ends 10 minutes before flight time, and even if the airplane is still at the gate, they will close the door and deny further boarding. 

 

Once on board the aircraft, you'll notice there is a "Fasten Seat Belt" light above the seat. When this light is on, it is important to stay seated, and keep your seat belt fastened. It is not appropriate to get out of your seat during taxiing, takeoff, or landing. 

 

Your seat will be small and cramped. You mentioned that you previously had taken a bus trip. Bus seats are probably the one seat that is smaller than an airline seat, so if you were OK on the bus, you should be OK there. You put your "personal item" (backpack, purse, small bag) under the seat in front of you. The overhead bins are for the larger carry-on rollaboard bags.

 

While flying through smooth air, the pilot may turn off the seat belt light. It's going to be tempting to unbuckle your seat belt. However, you are encouraged to keep it buckled at all times, in the event of unexpected and sudden turbulence. Speaking of turbulence -- no one likes it, but it's a fact of flying. It's unsettling for everyone, to various degrees. But for the most part, it's OK, and nothing bad is going to happen. If you have a view of the wings, you may see them flex a bit. They are designed specifically to do that, so nothing to worry about. 

 

The flight itself is probably going to be boring and uneventful (that's good!). American Airlines has been removing IFE (in-flight entertainment systems built into the seat in front of you) in favor of BYOD (bring your own device). You can connect to their on-board WiFi, and they will provide a content library to stream TV, movies, and music to your phone or tablet free of charge. The library is constantly changing, and may be different on each aircraft. Note that you may need to download a program to do this, so make sure to do so beforehand. Of course, you can also download stuff from Netflix/Amazon/etc before you leave as well. If you need power, most seats on AA will have a power plug to charge. Depending on the plane, it might be one plug for three seats to share. 

 

(When you get on board, you'll be asked to switch your phone to Airplane mode. This turns off cellular functions, but you can re-enable WiFi and Bluetooth.)

 

Many people recommend having noise cancelling headphones for the flight. The sound of the engines droning can get a bit loud, and with regular headphones you need may need to crank the volume to an unsafe level to hear. With noise cancelling headphones, it cancels out the engine noise, and makes listening to content much easier. Even a cheap set of noise cancelling headphones can work well. For example, I bought my headphones on Amazon for $40, and they work great. Are they as good as the expensive Bose headphones? No. But, for $300 less, they work great.

 

Aside from cookies and non-alcoholic beverages, you won't find food on board. Some flights will try and sell you a snack pack, but they're generally expensive, and yucky. Your best bet is to eat prior to your flight, or if you have time, during your connection (just make sure you are at the gate in time for boarding!). You are free to bring food or snacks on board the aircraft, but please be respectful, and avoid food that may have a smell or bother others. It's a tight cabin. No tuna fish sandwiches, please. LOL

 

Enjoy your first flight!

 

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Mechanical delays can happen and aren't anything to worry about from a safety standpoint. Everything on a commercial airplane involves heavily redundant systems and there are incredibly detailed requirements for commercial air operations in the USA and European Union realm. A mechanical delay can be for something as small as an inoperable pa system, burned out emergency light bulb, or a lack of plane safety cards in every seat back pocket. 

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On 1/11/2020 at 11:01 AM, Bizmark'sMom said:

Security is the most confusing part of the whole thing. You'll have to take your shoes off, along with any belts and jackets. You'll have to empty your pockets. Any liquids you bring need to be 3 oz or less - and they all have to fit in a QUART size ziplock bag. You'll pull that bag out of your carry-on, along with any lap tops or tablets. 

 

It gets more confusing in that this is a "maybe...maybe not". There's a chance OP may get TSA Pre-Check, in which case they go to the separate lane with separate rules allowing shoes to remain on, liquids to remain packed, etc. 

 

OP - plan for the stricter rules, but do check-in ahead of time online and see if you get TSA Pre-Check. They do sometimes randomly give it out - traveled with someone last week who had not flown in about four years and got Pre-Check on the return flight (but not on the outbound flight).

Edited by Zach1213

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14 minutes ago, sumiandkage said:

Mechanical delays can happen and aren't anything to worry about from a safety standpoint. Everything on a commercial airplane involves heavily redundant systems and there are incredibly detailed requirements for commercial air operations in the USA and European Union realm. A mechanical delay can be for something as small as an inoperable pa system, burned out emergency light bulb, or a lack of plane safety cards in every seat back pocket. 

 

Ugh, once had a five hour delay because the plastic cover over the emergency exit window light broke. We were at some small-ish outstation (I think Grand Forks?) and they had to put one on the next flight from MSP so that they could install it in Grand Forks before leaving.

 

Also once had a two hour delay on a DFW-Providenciales flight because the clip of a cargo net in the front cargo hold of an AA 737-800 had broken and they needed to submit an FAA waiver to fly with a broken cargo hold net clip even though they didn't plan to use that specific hold. 

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@Davis2010, you are getting some excellent advice here. Please try not to let it freak you out. Things will most likely go just fine. Indeed, chances are good that you would make your cruise on time given the current plan. However, I am extremely disappointed that your travel agent booked you as she did and has such a cavalier attitude toward the trip. Most travel agents are much better than that, and some are absolute treasures.

 

Seattle is a lovely city, and extra time there is an excellent idea, even if your timeline weren't tight. A planned overnight before your cruise will be nice if you can make it happen.

 

I echo the advice to learn about TSA rules and procedures and to ask for help. As everywhere, some people are grumps and most people are kind. If you let people know you are new flyers, I am confident you will find helpful airport personnel and passengers.

 

And, yes, wear your seatbelt throughout the flight, just as you would in a car. You might want to chew gum during takeoff and landing. As a Floridian, you are likely not used to elevation changes, and your ears may experience discomfort as the pressure changes. Chewing gum will force you to swallow, which will encourage your eustachian tubes to "pop."

 

I hope you have a lovely trip and decide to travel more by many modes in the future.

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30 minutes ago, Zach1213 said:

 

Ugh, once had a five hour delay because the plastic cover over the emergency exit window light broke. We were at some small-ish outstation (I think Grand Forks?) and they had to put one on the next flight from MSP so that they could install it in Grand Forks before leaving.

 

 

 

The airline Minimum Equipment List (MEL) for safe and allowed operation is a strange beast. A plastic cover is a delay reason, but then over Christmas, I was on a flight with an inoperable Auxiliary Power Unit, which not only powers the heat & air conditioning while on the ground but is also needed to start the main airplane engines. The pilot came on with a 'Well folks' explanation on why the plane sounded different durkng boarding because we were running power from the airport to keep the heat on and other technical stuff and it filtered down to my mind  that 'so the FAA says it's safe for a plane to fly even if they have to jump start the engines?' and apparently it is. 

Edited by sumiandkage

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15 hours ago, Invero said:

 the time for your flight is the time it is scheduled to take off. Boarding of the airplane is usually 30-40 minutes prior to that time.

 

 

Just a couple of comments here to clarify....

1.  The scheduled flight time is NOT the time scheduled to take off; rather, it is the time the aircraft is scheduled to push away from the gate.  Actual take-off is some time after that, due to time needed to taxi to the actual runway and potentially wait in line.  Likewise, the scheduled arrival time is time the aircraft is due at the arrival gate, not the time of touchdown on the runway.

2.  Boarding DOES begin usually 30-40 prior to departure time, and sometimes a boarding pass will state both flight time AND the time boarding begins.  Make sure you're looking at the right one!  i.e. don't look at flight time and think it's the boarding time; you'll miss your flight.   🙂

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41 minutes ago, sumiandkage said:

FAA says it's safe for a plane to fly even if they have to jump start the engines?' and apparently it is. 

 

Yes, it's fine. APU is definitely not a requirement, though it's nice to have. Once you start one engine, you can usually crossbleed to start the other(s). Some aircraft can use an APU for engine start mid-flight (should engine(s) go out), and some cannot. Otherwise, once in the air, APU's don't provide much. ETOPS rules may require an operational APU depending on the aircraft itself and what (if any) other generators they have available for engine restart. 

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1 hour ago, waterbug123 said:

 

Just a couple of comments here to clarify....

1.  The scheduled flight time is NOT the time scheduled to take off; rather, it is the time the aircraft is scheduled to push away from the gate.  Actual take-off is some time after that, due to time needed to taxi to the actual runway and potentially wait in line.  Likewise, the scheduled arrival time is time the aircraft is due at the arrival gate, not the time of touchdown on the runway.

 

Ahh, thank you for the correction! Now that I think, that makes much more sense. 🙂

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23 hours ago, sumiandkage said:

 

The airline Minimum Equipment List (MEL) for safe and allowed operation is a strange beast. A plastic cover is a delay reason, but then over Christmas, I was on a flight with an inoperable Auxiliary Power Unit, which not only powers the heat & air conditioning while on the ground but is also needed to start the main airplane engines. The pilot came on with a 'Well folks' explanation on why the plane sounded different durkng boarding because we were running power from the airport to keep the heat on and other technical stuff and it filtered down to my mind  that 'so the FAA says it's safe for a plane to fly even if they have to jump start the engines?' and apparently it is. 

 

Some early jet aircraft (Boeing 707 for example) didn't have an APU, and always required a jump-start from something called a JASU (Jet Air Start Unit).  If you find old photos of a 707 on the ramp, you'll see what looks like a worksite compressor next to the engine.  These days the ATR series of turboprops are the largest thing I can think of that doesn't have an APU

 

 

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26 minutes ago, scottbee said:

These days the ATR series of turboprops are the largest thing I can think of that doesn't have an APU

 

 

 

I believe that's the only one operating in the developed world that doesn't have one. I think there are still some DC-8's and 707's operating in a few parts of the world that don't have APUs. 

 

But, even then, the ATRs are not quite as prevalent as they once were. 

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On 1/14/2020 at 8:43 AM, Zach1213 said:

 

I believe that's the only one operating in the developed world that doesn't have one. I think there are still some DC-8's and 707's operating in a few parts of the world that don't have APUs. 

 

But, even then, the ATRs are not quite as prevalent as they once were. 

 

Maybe not in North America, but there's a lot of ATR72s flying, and they're still getting a fair number of orders.  According to Wikipedia there are 775 ATR72s in service, with a further 171 on order.

 

In North America the big three US airlines have gone all jet on their feeder routes, and the three large prop operators (Horizon, Air Canada Express, Westjet Encore) all use Q400s.  In Europe with the shorter distances though, the [slightly slower] ATR72 is much more common.

 

 

 

 

 

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On ‎1‎/‎6‎/‎2020 at 3:28 PM, Davis2010 said:

We are flying from Florida to Seattle to catch an Alaska cruise. We have never flown before. I need all the help in the world! Thank you!

Our TA booked flights through Princess EZair on American Airlines. 

air Alaska direct from Tampa non stop go the day before get a room and enjoy Seattle, we did it last year had a great time

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On ‎1‎/‎14‎/‎2020 at 4:15 PM, scottbee said:

 

Some early jet aircraft (Boeing 707 for example) didn't have an APU, and always required a jump-start from something called a JASU (Jet Air Start Unit).  If you find old photos of a 707 on the ramp, you'll see what looks like a worksite compressor next to the engine.  These days the ATR series of turboprops are the largest thing I can think of that doesn't have an APU

 

 

We had a jump start last year on a Ryanair 737-800.Common practise apparently and quite safe.

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Hope the OP lives on the ground floor,she's probably jumped out of the window by now,lol.

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Whatever you do, if you go on the day keep that early flight from JAX (my home airport too) since those usually leave on time except for weather.  If no delays, DFW (former home airport) is easier to make a tight connection by going up to the train or monorail, do not remember which.  Ask for help at every point on the plane and whoever is waiting at the door when you get off.  Go to the ship from the plane in Seattle.  Does your booking included transportation to the port?  Sometimes not good if waiting for other arrivals but maybe good for first big plane trip.  Also, does your Florida license have the star on it-do not know if star is required yet but Florida is doing them.

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3 hours ago, tvmovielover said:

Whatever you do, if you go on the day keep that early flight from JAX (my home airport too) since those usually leave on time except for weather.  If no delays, DFW (former home airport) is easier to make a tight connection by going up to the train or monorail, do not remember which.  Ask for help at every point on the plane and whoever is waiting at the door when you get off.  Go to the ship from the plane in Seattle.  Does your booking included transportation to the port?  Sometimes not good if waiting for other arrivals but maybe good for first big plane trip.  Also, does your Florida license have the star on it-do not know if star is required yet but Florida is doing them.

Yes, ask for help. Most people will be helpful. We were all first-time flyers at one point.

 

The Real-ID star is not required yet, but a passport will work when it is, starting in October. It's a good idea to upgrade when renewing the license. The federal requirement for IDs will not just be for flying, but for entering federal buildings, opening a bank account, and more.

 

 

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Florida driver's licenses have been Real-ID compliant since at least 2010. (I remember going through the hassle that year and then was like 'maybe it's time to get a passport again since I have all necessary documents in one folder because of the stupid driver's license thing') 

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