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Promising treatment


Toofarfromthesea
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From the beginning I have held the position that treatments are more important than vaccines in getting things, both in ships and on land, back to 'normal'.

If this report pans out, I think it will far more significant than vaccines that, they tell us, will not result in an end to all of the mask wearing and social distancing.

https://www.ynetnews.com/health_science/article/rJoYyaYeO?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook&utm_term=rJoYyaYeO&fbclid=IwAR0MA3iyvYKffg3LEZXo6MtjiiFiHPtsAR3SWVD6TEAU5ul9UlU0p_IvL7U

 

 

Professor Nadir Arber from the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center at the hospital tested a medication he has been developing on patients in moderate and serious condition suffering from the virus with a 95% positive result.

Arber says the medicine, named EXO-CD24, is inexpensive and effective and must be given once daily for five days.

Of the 30 patients that were given the drug, 29 showed a marked improvement within two days and were released from the hospital three to five days later.

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8 minutes ago, Toofarfromthesea said:

From the beginning I have held the position that treatments are more important than vaccines in getting things, both in ships and on land, back to 'normal'.

If this report pans out, I think it will far more significant than vaccines that, they tell us, will not result in an end to all of the mask wearing and social distancing.

https://www.ynetnews.com/health_science/article/rJoYyaYeO?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook&utm_term=rJoYyaYeO&fbclid=IwAR0MA3iyvYKffg3LEZXo6MtjiiFiHPtsAR3SWVD6TEAU5ul9UlU0p_IvL7U

 

 

Professor Nadir Arber from the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center at the hospital tested a medication he has been developing on patients in moderate and serious condition suffering from the virus with a 95% positive result.

Arber says the medicine, named EXO-CD24, is inexpensive and effective and must be given once daily for five days.

Of the 30 patients that were given the drug, 29 showed a marked improvement within two days and were released from the hospital three to five days later.

I hope it's true, but until the drug is subjected to a properly controlled scientific study the results are nothing more than hope.

 

You may recall the EUAs granted by the FDA to anti-malarial drugs early on in the pandemic based on preliminary indications that they were effective. When subjected to closer scrutiny the EUAs were withdrawn as the drugs were found to be neither safe nor effective.

 

The reality is that the vast majority of drugs that show promise initially never make it to market. This analysis of a wide range of drugs from the years 2006-2015 shows that only 9.6% actually made it all the way from Phase I study to market:

https://www.bio.org/sites/default/files/legacy/bioorg/docs/Clinical Development Success Rates 2006-2015 - BIO, Biomedtracker, Amplion 2016.pdf

 

This more recent study puts the success rate somewhat higher, but still at only 14% :

https://www.centerwatch.com/articles/12702-new-mit-study-puts-clinical-research-success-rate-at-14-percent

 

 

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3 hours ago, CruiserBruce said:

30 patients is a very limited study. And without comparing to similar patients that don't get the med, its not very confirming yet.

 

Here is something similar that did make a comparison test:

 

https://pharmaphorum.com/r-d/views-analysis-r-d/a-new-approach-to-covid-19-treatment/

The multicenter, randomised trial was initially conducted at a single centre and expanded to 196 patients at 12 study sites. Patients were administered with escalating doses of Zyesami by intravenous infusion and compared to a placebo control group.

Early data from trials were encouraging, with results from a study at Houston Methodist hospital in Texas showing approximately 81% of the patients who received the drug survived beyond 60 days, compared to just 17% of control patients. Those who had the treatment also demonstrated a nine-fold increased probability of survival and recovery from respiratory failure.

 

Hopefully more will be coming as the vaccines aren't going to be enough for the foreseeable future and maybe never as the virus will continue to mutate.

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Maybe complementary but I can't see how this is superior to a vaccine? Isn't it better to prevent people getting sick in the first place? If you have to treat them you are are still taking up hospital resources and spaces for a disease that is highly infectious and has the potential to get out of control. The 20% who don't respond can end up being a lot of people especially if you are a small Caribbean nation who doesn't have a lot of medical resources to spare in the first place. Preventing people from ending up in hospital just seems like the more logical option🤔

Edited by ilikeanswers
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