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Tips for better landscape photos

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I just came across this today and I think there are some good tips here for all of us who are amateurs.  Maybe we can start a list of other tips you have and use.

 

Tips for better landscape photos

 

 

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On 6/16/2019 at 2:13 AM, gottagoacruzn said:

Well, I just got a digital aim an shoot camera. Don't know any of those other things that were talked about.

 

Many aim and shoot cameras do have some of the capabilities mentioned.

 

If you tell us the make and model of your camera, some poster may be able to provide some guidance on how these relate.

 

Otherwise, just think about some of the basics:

 

composition — what do I want my picture to look like. Will the picture be better if I move a little to either side, back, forwards? Will the picture be better landscape or portrait.

light — how much light is there? Is there light or shadow on what I am trying to photograph? How does the light or shadow enhance the image? (No, the built in flash will not light up the mountain 5 miles away.) If it is darkish, the camera may try and stay open longer, inducing shake.

edges — look at all the edges of your view through the camera. Are there things there that you don’t want? 

 

And on.

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Thanks for posting the link, very interesting.

 

On Thursday evening my camera club is having a presentation called The visualisation, capture and processing for Landscape Photography, by Les Walkling.

 

Part of the talk will focus on the work of the late Peter Dombrovskis. His work was instrumental in a major environmental campaign in Tasmania and is certainly worth looking up. The power of the landscape imagery in pristine wilderness captured public attention. (Franklin Dam)

 

“Walkling spent ten months in the preparation, restoration, editing, and exhibition printing of over 200 of Dombrovskis’ images for the National Library of Australia exhibition and accompanying publication, The Photography of Peter Dombrovskis: Journeys into the Wild.”

 

 

 

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On 6/15/2019 at 12:13 PM, gottagoacruzn said:

Well, I just got a digital aim an shoot camera. Don't know any of those other things that were talked about.

 

There are also some great videos on YoutTube that would be very helpful in guiding you through the features on your new camera. As the other poster mentioned, knowing which type of camera (make, model) will enable everyone to give you more accurate tips.

 

Essentially, the blog post linked in the OP is about equipment that can help make photography much better by using specific lenses and other items (adding on a lens hood, which would help control the light going into the lens) polarization filters (Ever get polarized sunglasses? Things look better, different with regard to the light) and other items like the type of swivel on your tripod - any camera can move on a tripod but they don't all move as easily or the same way. Kind of like turning a car at the same speed on a tight corner, but doing it in a Porsche, or in a Beetle. The Beetle will sway all over the place, screechy tires, but the Porsche will hold on tight, smoothly turn, effortlessly. So you can get a Porsche tripod....or not. Does everyone need a Porsche tripod? No. Depends upon what type of photos you want to take but....if you intend to do things that manipulate and control light, shutter speed, and/or you want to remove your camera from the tripod safely/quickly, having a better tripod is the way to go....sort of like turning a tight corner fast in a car. You can do it, but it works better with better equipment.

 

FYI shutter speed is the click you hear when you take the picture...slowing it down changes everything and you need the camera to be immobile so you need that tripod.

 

The remotes s/he talked about....probably more than you need to worry about right now but they all tie into the same equation with regard to getting light/speed/motion correct and individual preferences, options.

 

But, to get started, probably best to go to YouTube and type in the name of your camera and the word "tutuorial" and get a pen and paper to make notes or, just save the video on your phone to reference it again. Then, have fun and go practice taking pictures. You can always delete them! If your camera has manual mode, you can always later on try to work with these sort of things, different light, shutter speeds, filler, filters, etc.

 

BTW, a wide angle is just simply another lens (ultra is just that, wider!) to get more into a frame than a typical lens would ordinarily fit into a photo. It's usually expressed in millimeters but think of it in terms of what the eyes can see when looking out panoramically. Most cameras' standard lens will crop out a lot of it. WIde lenses take in more of what is on the right and left side of the desired image but....keep in mind if there are people in the image, they will appear distorted although the better the lens, the less so. Landscapes generally are less affected by distortion from the wide angle effect of lenses plus there are other things great photographers do that mitigate the effects of the lens. When the light is right, focus, everything else, you'll never care or notice and be glad you're seeing everything due to a wide angle lens. 

 

Enjoy your new camera! 

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Hi guys, better clarify that I've had my Kodak FZ151 digital camera now for awhile, but thanks for the info. Will look up the info on line.

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22 minutes ago, gottagoacruzn said:

Hi guys, better clarify that I've had my Kodak FZ151 digital camera now for awhile, but thanks for the info. Will look up the info on line.

 

The suggestions in the article were geared towards users of interchangeable lens cameras but every camera uses three basic exposure factors and three pieces of hardware to make the photo. Exposure is controlled by the sensitivity of the sensor (film speed in the pre-digital days), the amount of time the shutter allows the sensor to be exposed to light and the amount of light gathered by the lens and passed through the aperture. Those factors are required to be addressed in every camera. our camera has a sensor, shutter and lens just like a $10,000 Leica. Taking the time to understand how the three factor of exposure work together and the advantages or disadvantages of your hardware will give you a greater chance of getting good shots. Your camera has a manual mode that allows some control over the exposure settings outside of the auto mode that, with some understanding of how exposure works, may allow you to overcome difficult shooting situations. Even if you only use the mode and scene settings. a little research into how exposure is determined by the little supercomputer in you camera can help you when a shot goes bad. Something as simple as knowing when to use the +/- exposures setting (EV Setting in your camera manual) can save the day.

 

Look up that info as you said and don't be shy about asking questions here. This is a very newbie-friendly forum with many regulars willing to take a moment to explain something.

 

A while ago I wrote an article on low-light photography that gives a lot of basic information on how exposure works. Take a look: Low-Light Photography

 

Enjoy your camera!

 

Dave

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Hi Dave, whenever I'm on a cruise, have tried to take pictures of the shows, without the flash, but the pictures come out blurry or not good. Any suggestions?

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10 hours ago, gottagoacruzn said:

Hi Dave, whenever I'm on a cruise, have tried to take pictures of the shows, without the flash, but the pictures come out blurry or not good. Any suggestions?

 

The shows may look bright to you while sitting in a darkened theater but the actual illumination is about the same as a normally lit room. Your camera will make up for this by slowing the shutter speed down to expose longer. This is what causes the blur. To help this, you need to increase the shutter speed. The three components of exposure are shutter, sensitivity and aperture. To speed up the shutter, you need to raise the sensitivity and/or open the lens aperture wider. A point and shoot camera doesn't allow a lot of options since the small sensor doesn't let you increase the sensitivity a lot without making the photo too grainy (noisy) and the lenses often don't have a large maximum aperture (can't let enough light in). Your best option is probably to go into the Scene menu and choose "Sports". This mode tells the camera's brain to set the shutter as fast as possible to stop action and will raise sensitivity and open the aperture as much as possible to achieve this. Also, don't zoom in more than needed since zooming will reduce the maximum aperture (lets in less light) and magnification will exaggerate motion, both yours and the subject, which can cause more blur. If the performers are too bright and the stage looks normal (camera's auto metering ties to average out the whole exposure and often does badly with a bright subject against a dark background, or vice versa), use the exposure adjustment (+/-) to adjust downwards (-). This will not only correct the exposure on the performers but may allow for a faster shutter speed.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Dave

 

Edited by pierces

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