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schmoopie17

If you had to pick three grossest foods...

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Posted (edited)

When it comes to food, my no-go list is very small, but...

  • French onion soup - The slimy look of boiled onions <shudders!>.  No amount of Gruyere cheese can hide it.
  • dry poppy seeds - They get stuck between my teeth. Ugh!  Steamed poppy seeds, like on a Big Mac, are fine.
  • mashed potatoes - Too many bad run-ins as a kid: lumpy or cold.  I'll eat only instant ones I made myself.
  • (honorable mention) okra - Again, slimy texture, but I had it served to me maybe three times in my whole life.

Other than those, I'll eat anything, and I mean anything.  I tried blood sausage, canned herring on toast, sauteed chicken livers (soak them in milk for a few hours before you cook them), beef tongue, jellyfish, balut, spicy dried squid, etc.  Some of them I found odd, but nothing I refused to eat again.

Edited by LandlockedCruiser01

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Posted (edited)
On 7/5/2019 at 6:43 AM, LandlockedCruiser01 said:

slimy texture, but I had it served to me maybe three times in my whole life.

 

Okra, cut into sections, rolled in corn meal, fried to a crisp.  Not slimy and worth a try.  BTW, I agree boiled okra ranks up there with liver.

Edited by RocketMan275

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5 minutes ago, RocketMan275 said:

Okra, cut into sections, rolled in corn meal, fried to a crisp.  Not slimy and worth a try.  BTW, I agree boiled okra ranks up there with liver.

Hmm... that's one way I haven't tried okra.  Maybe I'll order it that way in a Cajun/Creole restaurant.  Last time I ate it was in New Orleans in late 2012.  It was in spicy seafood gumbo.  I ate the gumbo; the spices, the rice, and the seafood helped cut through the okra slime.  But I left all the okra pieces on a napkin.

 

I disagree with you on the liver.  It's pretty good if you cook it right.  (I think I even saw it on Carnival's dinner menu, but I could be wrong.)  Soaking it in milk removes that chalky taste most people don't like.  As a kid, I ate liver by drenching it in ketchup, and my parents didn't object.  Today, I soak it in milk, then saute it in oil with cream of mushroom soup, and serve it with seasonings.

 

One catch: when you buy liver, get organic.  It's a filtering organ, so the organic one is much cleaner, and not much more expensive, since it's not popular to begin with.  The regular one absorbs whatever crap they feed to the animals.

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1 hour ago, LandlockedCruiser01 said:

Hmm... that's one way I haven't tried okra.  Maybe I'll order it that way in a Cajun/Creole restaurant.  Last time I ate it was in New Orleans in late 2012.  It was in spicy seafood gumbo.  I ate the gumbo; the spices, the rice, and the seafood helped cut through the okra slime.  But I left all the okra pieces on a napkin.

 

I disagree with you on the liver.  It's pretty good if you cook it right.  (I think I even saw it on Carnival's dinner menu, but I could be wrong.)  Soaking it in milk removes that chalky taste most people don't like.  As a kid, I ate liver by drenching it in ketchup, and my parents didn't object.  Today, I soak it in milk, then saute it in oil with cream of mushroom soup, and serve it with seasonings.

 

You can get fried okra all over the south.  BTW, it works equally well if you put it on a cookie sheet and bake it in the oven.

 

I find it amusing that when one suggests a liver recipe it always includes this statement:  "Try it this way, it doesn't taste like liver".  When you have to fix something in a way that it doesn't taste like what it is, that should tell you something.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, clo said:

I wonder where you got the idea that those onions are boiled.  Except for reducing the small amount of wine that's added there's no boiling at all.

 

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/french-onion-soup-recipe2-1947434

I don't know.  They look and feel boiled to me: very soft and slimy.  The first (and only) time I tasted French onion soup, I had to leave the table, under the pretext of needing to use the bathroom.  In reality, I thought my stomach was going to turn inside out.  

 

Boiled or mushy onions is the only food I have a strong aversion to.  Caramelized, I can stand, but would prefer to leave out.  The only way I actually enjoy eating onions is fresh, like in a taco or a burger.  And it doesn't need to be sweet Vidalia onions, either.

Edited by LandlockedCruiser01

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1 minute ago, LandlockedCruiser01 said:

And it doesn't need to be sweet Vidalia onions, either.

I grew up in Atlanta and Vidalias are the ever lovin' best, aren't they?  Just had some tonight.

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1 hour ago, LandlockedCruiser01 said:

I don't know.  They look and feel boiled to me: very soft and slimy.  The first (and only) time I tasted French onion soup, I had to leave the table, under the pretext of needing to use the bathroom.  In reality, I thought my stomach was going to turn inside out.  

 

Boiled or mushy onions is the only food I have a strong aversion to.  Caramelized, I can stand, but would prefer to leave out.  The only way I actually enjoy eating onions is fresh, like in a taco or a burger.  And it doesn't need to be sweet Vidalia onions, either.

BTW I'm not lover of that soup either.  I just think it's too rich and one-tone.

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My addition to this list:

 

Pork Belly:  A Princess celebrity chef creation.  I took two bites and knew that if I ate the whole thing, my digestive system would punish me for doing so.

 

Parsnips:  I'll eat them--if I have too--but I don't care for them.

 

Chicken Feet:  I'll pass.  I know they are consumed in many parts of the world and help make the best use of the chicken.  Their appearance deters me from trying them. 

 

 

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On 7/5/2019 at 9:43 PM, LandlockedCruiser01 said:
  • dry poppy seeds - They get stuck between my teeth. Ugh!  Steamed poppy seeds, like on a Big Mac, are fine.

 

Those aren't poppy seeds they are white sesame seeds.

 

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3 hours ago, ilikeanswers said:

Those aren't poppy seeds they are white sesame seeds.

D'oh!  You're right.  I confused the two.  Then again, I don't like either, for the most part.

Edited by LandlockedCruiser01

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