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paul1439

What makes 6 star cruise line

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Paul, the biggest difference between "stars" for cruise ships and hotels is that hotel "stars" are, for the most part, standardized. The most popular rating company used to be "AAA". There were set standards for a hotel to achieve each level. As I've posted previously, if there were standards for luxury cruise lines, it would be a lot easier.

 

In terms of cabin/suite size, they are all over the place - especially since single travelers want (and need) to be able to book a cabin/suite on their own. Regent's Explorer may be the first "new" ship that initially built small suites for that reason and later made the unpopular decision to make them entry level suites (still considered suites by cruise ship standards - bedroom, living room, balcony but small). Most repeat customers on Regent are avoiding these suites but they seem to be fine for people new to luxury cruising that are used to small cabins.

 

It is too bad that we can't have this discussion on a ship as you have a some good points and some that I disagree with. I really don't pay attention to how many "stars" a cruise line gets or are given by some random travel writer. There seems to be the same luxury cruise lines sailing now as there were when we started sailing in 2004. Regent changed owners/names, Seabourn changed owners and so has Crystal. In most cases, the new owners have improved the brand (even though Seabourn has the unfortunate connection with Carnival and Regent now has the same with NCL). Silversea continues on - privately owned.

 

In any case, it is unlikely that any of us will agree on what a 6 star cruise line is or is not.

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Example 5 star or circles for Ritz Carlton and 2 star or circles for Motel 6. Cruise lines have the same ratings example Silversea vs Carnival lines.

But in most cases, those "stars" are not standardized (at least in North America). It's still subjective, either by the ratings group (eg auto club, travel website) or by the hotel themselves. Even the AAA diamond ratings use subjective criteria (words like "affordable", "adequate", or "easily"), though there are some non-subjective things as well (such as whether the provided ice bucket is insulated or not).

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Keith1010,

 

This thread is the first time I have seen any of your postings. And I do not come to this board much. That being said I would like to say that I appreciate the way you pose your opinion(s). Arguing which line is the best is such a waste of time IMNSHO. The bottom line as you have pointed out is that your own opinion is what counts the most.

 

It's nice to read well thought out posts!

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Keith1010,

 

This thread is the first time I have seen any of your postings. And I do not come to this board much. That being said I would like to say that I appreciate the way you pose your opinion(s). Arguing which line is the best is such a waste of time IMNSHO. The bottom line as you have pointed out is that your own opinion is what counts the most.

 

It's nice to read well thought out posts!

 

You can always count on Keith for that. And I agree with what he says, as usual.

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You are right. You offer no logic. What makes you the authority?

 

The same thing that makes you an arbiter, his/your opinion. Wish you would accept that your opinion is just that, your opinion, and not the be all and end all. :cool:

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As I said before, I wouldn't mind a standard at all but nobody is ever going to agree on one. Especially not if it is left to cruisers to decide. Ask 10 people, get 10 opinions.

As an example, for me, AI is absolutely not a sign of luxury. And cabin size, where does it start? Is 25m2 enough? Does it have to be 27m2 or even 30m2? And why? And service is a very important factor as well. You can have great hardware but without good service, it's nothing. But again, attentive service for one might be annoying chatty service to another. :confused:

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As I said before, I wouldn't mind a standard at all but nobody is ever going to agree on one. Especially not if it is left to cruisers to decide. Ask 10 people, get 10 opinions.

As an example, for me, AI is absolutely not a sign of luxury. And cabin size, where does it start? Is 25m2 enough? Does it have to be 27m2 or even 30m2? And why? And service is a very important factor as well. You can have great hardware but without good service, it's nothing. But again, attentive service for one might be annoying chatty service to another. :confused:

 

Completely agree with you. IMO, cruisers are the worst possible people to determine what is luxury and what is not. So much is based upon our experiences. This reminds me of a discussion of caviar. Some people get so excited when they see "paddlefish eggs" on the menu (the cruise lines call it caviar which it might be to some but it certainly isn't to others.

 

What you said about service is true. Expectations are different depending upon the country you are from. Some passengers prefer to be treated and addressed formally while others would find it very "stuffy" and uncomfortable.

 

Also, I have learned that suite size is also subjective. While we prefer larger suites with 1 1/2 bathrooms, others are happy in a small suite (again, speaking only about luxury cruise lines).

 

The one area where we disagree somewhat is about being all-inclusive. Certainly, you cannot take a mainstream cruise line, make it all-inclusive and call it "luxury". However, when luxury cruise lines began going all-inclusive, the other luxury lines followed. In order to be AI and luxury, the food and service has to live up to the "luxury" rating.

 

Since 2004, almost all of our cruises have been on luxury cruise lines. We have seen changes. Luxury cruise lines are more inclusive (some cruise lines including air -- even Business Class--, excursions, etc. Also, the dress code has gone from formal to elegant casual. What has not changed is the level of service and food quality.

 

The bottom line for me is that, unless or until cruisers sail on all luxury, premium-plus and premium cruise lines, their input in terms of setting "standards" will be flawed. Actually, even if they met this criteria, who is to say that what one person considers luxury would be the same for someone else.

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. Actually, even if they met this criteria, who is to say that what one person considers luxury would be the same for someone else.

This is a truly definitive statement on the subject,

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On 8/13/2017 at 8:33 PM, Travelcat2 said:

As I said before, I wouldn't mind a standard at all but nobody is ever going to agree on one. Especially not if it is left to cruisers to decide. Ask 10 people, get 10 opinions.


As an example, for me, AI is absolutely not a sign of luxury. And cabin size, where does it start? Is 25m2 enough? Does it have to be 27m2 or even 30m2? And why? And service is a very important factor as well. You can have great hardware but without good service, it's nothing. But again, attentive service for one might be annoying chatty service to another. :confused:



Completely agree with you. IMO, cruisers are the worst possible people to determine what is luxury and what is not. So much is based upon our experiences. This reminds me of a discussion of caviar. Some people get so excited when they see "paddlefish eggs" on the menu (the cruise lines call it caviar which it might be to some but it certainly isn't to others.

What you said about service is true. Expectations are different depending upon the country you are from. Some passengers prefer to be treated and addressed formally while others would find it very "stuffy" and uncomfortable.

Also, I have learned that suite size is also subjective. While we prefer larger suites with 1 1/2 bathrooms, others are happy in a small suite (again, speaking only about luxury cruise lines).

The one area where we disagree somewhat is about being all-inclusive. Certainly, you cannot take a mainstream cruise line, make it all-inclusive and call it "luxury". However, when luxury cruise lines began going all-inclusive, the other luxury lines followed. In order to be AI and luxury, the food and service has to live up to the "luxury" rating.

Since 2004, almost all of our cruises have been on luxury cruise lines. We have seen changes. Luxury cruise lines are more inclusive (some cruise lines including air -- even Business Class--, excursions, etc. Also, the dress code has gone from formal to elegant casual. What has not changed is the level of service and food quality.

The bottom line for me is that, unless or until cruisers sail on all luxury, premium-plus and premium cruise lines, their input in terms of setting "standards" will be flawed. Actually, even if they met this criteria, who is to say that what one person considers luxury would be the same for someone else.

Luxury (6 star) cruise lines always must have somewhat gourmet food #1. Passenger capacity under 1,000. All suite or higher. and always white glove service.

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On 10/16/2018 at 2:01 PM, paul1439 said:

Luxury (6 star) cruise lines always must have somewhat gourmet food #1. Passenger capacity under 1,000. All suite or higher. and always white glove service.

 

What is "gourmet food" to one person may not be to another.  Food is so subjective that making it a criteria for luxury does not work for me.  

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5 hours ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

What is "gourmet food" to one person may not be to another.  Food is so subjective that making it a criteria for luxury does not work for me.  

 

5 hours ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

What is "gourmet food" to one person may not be to another.  Food is so subjective that making it a criteria for luxury does not work for me.  

Since you are not cruiser FOOD is #1 priority. If the food stinks so does the cruise line. Learn about cruising before you make a comment about food on a ship.

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15 minutes ago, paul1439 said:

Since you are not cruiser FOOD is #1 priority. If the food stinks so does the cruise line. Learn about cruising before you make a comment about food on a ship.

Huh?  Your comments are a non-sequitor to the posts you quoted.  All they said is that the enjoyment of food is subjective, and what one person considers great food may not be considered great by someone else. 

Food is an important priority, but all that means is that it is important that you think it is great -- but that says nothing about whether someone else might also think it's great.  To them, food may also be a priority, but they will choose a different line because it offers them food they think is great.

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6 minutes ago, calliopecruiser said:

Huh?  Your comments are a non-sequitor to the posts you quoted.  All they said is that the enjoyment of food is subjective, and what one person considers great food may not be considered great by someone else. 

Food is an important priority, but all that means is that it is important that you think it is great -- but that says nothing about whether someone else might also think it's great.  To them, food may also be a priority, but they will choose a different line because it offers them food they think is great.

Tell me your logic about food. What don't you understand about food? Either it's good or bad. What I think about food doesn't matter. The majority of cruisers and critics are the determining factor of good or bad food. Six star cruise lines must be a step above all other cruise lines. This is the reason I used the term gourmet.

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Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, paul1439 said:

Either it's good or bad. What I think about food doesn't matter.

Actually, what you think is exactly what "good" and "bad" are.  Subjective assessments.  There is no objective definition of "good" or "bad" - they are judgmental decisions based on your (or someone else's, or group of others') assessment

 

 

Edited by calliopecruiser

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1 hour ago, paul1439 said:

 

Since you are not cruiser FOOD is #1 priority. If the food stinks so does the cruise line. Learn about cruising before you make a comment about food on a ship.

 

Truly have no idea what you are talking about.  We have done 40 cruises (33 on Regent) and do know good food from "food that stinks".  You may want to learn what you are posting about before belittling someone!!!!!

 

calliopecruiser has it right (thank you).   

 

 

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8 hours ago, calliopecruiser said:

Actually, what you think is exactly what "good" and "bad" are.  Subjective assessments.  There is no objective definition of "good" or "bad" - they are judgmental decisions based on your (or someone else's, or group of others') assessment

 

 

How do you think they rate cruise lines or restaurants? According to you it doesn't matter.

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8 hours ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

Truly have no idea what you are talking about.  We have done 40 cruises (33 on Regent) and do know good food from "food that stinks".  You may want to learn what you are posting about before belittling someone!!!!!

 

calliopecruiser has it right (thank you).   

 

 

I started in 1973 cruising. I have been on 60+ cruises (variety cruise lines including Regent). Since you have limited amount experience on a different cruise lines maybe you should learn how cruisers rate cruise lines base on several categories including food. You truly have no idea what your talking about. (thank you).

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39 minutes ago, paul1439 said:

I started in 1973 cruising. I have been on 60+ cruises (variety cruise lines including Regent). Since you have limited amount experience on a different cruise lines maybe you should learn how cruisers rate cruise lines base on several categories including food. You truly have no idea what your talking about. (thank you).

I assume English is your second language which is why your grammar is not the best and you are abusing people. 

I don’t think the number of cruises you’ve done is really relevant in determining the quality of food. Surely the standard for food is set in all kinds of restaurant, whether they be at sea or on dry land. Somebody who goes to fine dining establishments all over the world and has never been on a cruise would have as much experience as you on judging food.

Yes, there are various food rating systems around the world that attempt to treat good cooking as something that can truly be measured. Also the difference between fine dining and less expensive food service is quite obvious. So all I would say is that to be six star a ship has to offer a fine dining experience when it is appropriate. But even more important the food affected at all times has to be of the highest quality. One can have bacon and eggs for breakfast, as long both ingredients are the best in their class and are cooked to the taste of the passenger, then the proper six star standard will be met. So quality of ingredients is all important, as well as the cooking and the variety.

Having said all that, a ship can be six star and hit all the right buttons as any objective measure of food is concerned and still some very experienced passengers will not find the food to their taste. If enough passengers feel this way then you could have a chef with Michelin stars up to his armpits, but the passengers will not  care.

i took a trip on Regent a few years back and I found the food to be solid but not very adventurous. My wife later went on kitchen tour of Paul Gaugin and was told that by the chef that we probably found the food bland because of the different cuts of meat and the increased fat content that American ships served. He said that on Gaugin they had tried Australian and New Zealand meat but this had not gone down well with American passengers.

Personally, I think the food on a ship is good when you can, with a bit of notice, arrange for the chef to cook you any meal you want. I also like it when the chef goes to the local market on port days and picks up some locally sourced ingredients to serve on the ship.

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Some years ago on Regent the quality of the cuisine during the voyage from Miami to Honolulu was average at best.

 

Departing from Honolulu, we bumped into the Executive Chef, who was French, and had trained at a 2* Michelin restaurant, whom we had got to know well during previous voyages, and asked him about the quality of the cuisine.

He told us that he had just boarded the ship, and from what he had seen he reckoned it would take him 2-3 days to bring the quality of the cuisine up to his standards.

After 2 days the food was superb.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Toryhere said:

I assume English is your second language which is why your grammar is not the best and you are abusing people. 

I don’t think the number of cruises you’ve done is really relevant in determining the quality of food. Surely the standard for food is set in all kinds of restaurant, whether they be at sea or on dry land. Somebody who goes to fine dining establishments all over the world and has never been on a cruise would have as much experience as you on judging food.

Yes, there are various food rating systems around the world that attempt to treat good cooking as something that can truly be measured. Also the difference between fine dining and less expensive food service is quite obvious. So all I would say is that to be six star a ship has to offer a fine dining experience when it is appropriate. But even more important the food affected at all times has to be of the highest quality. One can have bacon and eggs for breakfast, as long both ingredients are the best in their class and are cooked to the taste of the passenger, then the proper six star standard will be met. So quality of ingredients is all important, as well as the cooking and the variety.

Having said all that, a ship can be six star and hit all the right buttons as any objective measure of food is concerned and still some very experienced passengers will not find the food to their taste. If enough passengers feel this way then you could have a chef with Michelin stars up to his armpits, but the passengers will not  care.

i took a trip on Regent a few years back and I found the food to be solid but not very adventurous. My wife later went on kitchen tour of Paul Gaugin and was told that by the chef that we probably found the food bland because of the different cuts of meat and the increased fat content that American ships served. He said that on Gaugin they had tried Australian and New Zealand meat but this had not gone down well with American passengers.

Personally, I think the food on a ship is good when you can, with a bit of notice, arrange for the chef to cook you any meal you want. I also like it when the chef goes to the local market on port days and picks up some locally sourced ingredients to serve on the ship.

 

Agree with what you posted.  Tastes are so different around the world that finding agreement is not easy.  When you add to that rude posters (which is best to ignore) it is difficult to have a sane discussion.  

 

 

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4 hours ago, Toryhere said:

I assume English is your second language which is why your grammar is not the best and you are abusing people. 

I don’t think the number of cruises you’ve done is really relevant in determining the quality of food. Surely the standard for food is set in all kinds of restaurant, whether they be at sea or on dry land. Somebody who goes to fine dining establishments all over the world and has never been on a cruise would have as much experience as you on judging food.

Yes, there are various food rating systems around the world that attempt to treat good cooking as something that can truly be measured. Also the difference between fine dining and less expensive food service is quite obvious. So all I would say is that to be six star a ship has to offer a fine dining experience when it is appropriate. But even more important the food affected at all times has to be of the highest quality. One can have bacon and eggs for breakfast, as long both ingredients are the best in their class and are cooked to the taste of the passenger, then the proper six star standard will be met. So quality of ingredients is all important, as well as the cooking and the variety.

Having said all that, a ship can be six star and hit all the right buttons as any objective measure of food is concerned and still some very experienced passengers will not find the food to their taste. If enough passengers feel this way then you could have a chef with Michelin stars up to his armpits, but the passengers will not  care.

i took a trip on Regent a few years back and I found the food to be solid but not very adventurous. My wife later went on kitchen tour of Paul Gaugin and was told that by the chef that we probably found the food bland because of the different cuts of meat and the increased fat content that American ships served. He said that on Gaugin they had tried Australian and New Zealand meat but this had not gone down well with American passengers.

Personally, I think the food on a ship is good when you can, with a bit of notice, arrange for the chef to cook you any meal you want. I also like it when the chef goes to the local market on port days and picks up some locally sourced ingredients to serve on the ship.

With your hot air interpretation of food,  bottom line the quality of food on all cruise ships are rated. Before you have something to say learn the difference between six star cruise lines and five star cruise lines.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/27/2019 at 8:26 AM, paul1439 said:

With your hot air interpretation of food,  bottom line the quality of food on all cruise ships are rated. Before you have something to say learn the difference between six star cruise lines and five star cruise lines.

 

Since you THINK that you know, why not enlighten us?  Please don't bring up food as that will not work for anyone.  Most of us know how subjective food is.

Edited by Travelcat2

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1 hour ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

Since you THINK that you know, why not enlighten us?  Please don't bring up food as that will not work for anyone.  Most of us know how subjective food is.

 

1 hour ago, Travelcat2 said:

 

Since you THINK that you know, why not enlighten us?  Please don't bring up food as that will not work for anyone.  Most of us know how subjective food is.

Three people is not most of us.  Search six star cruise lines for my standards

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On 3/29/2019 at 1:23 PM, paul1439 said:

 

Three people is not most of us.  Search six star cruise lines for my standards

There is no such thing as any standard rating system that makes food the major characteristic of a 6 star rating for a cruise ship.

And since when are your standards any less subjective than anyone else’s?

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